Document Detail


Adiponectin, systolic blood pressure, and alcohol consumption are associated with more aortic stiffness progression among apparently healthy men.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23040831     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: Limited data are available about risk factors for the progression of aortic stiffness in healthy population. We examined several risk factors as possible independent predictors of aortic stiffness progression among a population-based sample of US men.
METHODS: A total of 240 men (40-49 years) free of CVD at baseline from the Pittsburgh site of the ERA JUMP study were evaluated. Aortic stiffness was measured as carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity at baseline and after 4.6 ± 0.2 (mean ± SD) years of follow-up. Progression of aortic stiffness was evaluated as relative annual change in carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (% change/year). Using linear regression, both baseline potential risk factors and their annual changes were evaluated as possible risk factors for aortic stiffness progression. Baseline age, follow-up time, race, heart rate, and medications use were forced in all models.
RESULTS: During follow-up, relative to baseline level, aortic stiffness increased 0.3% ± 5.3% per year. In final models, the independent predictors of degree of aortic stiffness progression were lower levels of adiponectin (P = 0.03), higher levels of systolic blood pressure (P = 0.03), greater annual change in systolic blood pressure (P = 0.04), and alcohol consumption ≥ 2 times/week (P = 0.02). Adiponectin levels within the third (9.8 μg/Ml ≤ adiponectin < 13.0 μg/mL) and the fourth (adiponectin ≥ 13.0 μg/mL) quartiles were associated with an improvement in relative annual aortic stiffness progression (P = 0.02, P = 0.01, respectively) compared to levels within the first quartile (adiponectin ≤ 7.0 μg/mL).
CONCLUSION: Among apparently healthy men, lower levels of baseline adiponectin could be a novel marker for greater risk of aortic stiffness progression. Longitudinal research is required to evaluate whether adiponectin change over time would have similar association with aortic stiffness progression.
Authors:
Samar R El Khoudary; Emma Barinas-Mitchell; Jessica White; Kim Sutton-Tyrrell; Lewis H Kuller; J David Curb; Chol Shin; Hirotsugu Ueshima; Kamal Masaki; Rhobert W Evans; Katsuyuki Miura; Daniel Edmundowicz; Akira Sekikawa;
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2012-09-23
Journal Detail:
Title:  Atherosclerosis     Volume:  225     ISSN:  1879-1484     ISO Abbreviation:  Atherosclerosis     Publication Date:  2012 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-11-20     Completed Date:  2013-05-02     Revised Date:  2014-03-25    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0242543     Medline TA:  Atherosclerosis     Country:  Ireland    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  475-80     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adiponectin / blood*
Adult
Alcohol Drinking / blood*,  epidemiology,  physiopathology*
Aorta / physiopathology*
Atherosclerosis / blood*,  diagnosis,  epidemiology,  physiopathology*
Biological Markers / blood
Blood Pressure*
Disease Progression
Down-Regulation
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Pennsylvania / epidemiology
Pulse Wave Analysis
Risk Factors
Systole
Time Factors
Vascular Stiffness*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
HL071561/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; R01 HL068200/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; R01 HL071561/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; R01 HL68200/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; T32 HL083825/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/ADIPOQ protein, human; 0/Adiponectin; 0/Biological Markers
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Effects of ezetimibe added to statin therapy on markers of cholesterol absorption and synthesis and ...
Next Document:  Obesity paradox: Differential effects on cancer and noncancer mortality in patients with type 2 diab...