Document Detail


Adaptive sex ratios and parent-offspring conflict.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  11165696     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Studies testing the theoretical prediction that birds would adaptively vary the sex ratio of their offspring either supported theoretical predictions or simply found a 1:1 sex ratio. Four recent papers, in particular one by Kate Oddie, of Great Tit nestling sex ratios, however, found that, when conditions are poor, the sex ratio is male biased, opposite of what was predicted by theory. The development of molecular markers to sex birds using minute amounts of blood has allowed experiments that help us to explain this apparent anomaly.
Authors:
A A. Dhondt; W M. Hochachka
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Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Trends in ecology & evolution (Personal edition)     Volume:  16     ISSN:  0169-5347     ISO Abbreviation:  Trends Ecol. Evol. (Amst.)     Publication Date:  2001 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2001-Feb-12     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8805125     Medline TA:  Trends Ecol Evol     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  61-62     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Ornithology, Cornell University, 159 Sapsucker Woods Road, 14850, Ithaca, NY, USA
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