Document Detail


Acute pain speeds skin barrier recovery in healthy men and women.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23148814     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: Psychological stress is known to impair skin barrier recovery, but little is known about the impact of pain on skin healing processes. Our primary goals were to examine the degree to which acute pain affects recovery from skin barrier disruption, and the potential mediating impact of cortisol and catecholamines.
METHODS: Healthy non-smokers aged 18-43 (N = 53, 65% women) underwent a 3-minute cold pressor pain stimulus to their foot. Tape-stripping of forearm skin occurred at two separate locations: before (site 1) and after (site 2) the pain stimulus. Transepidural water loss (TEWL) was assessed at baseline (pre-stripping), immediately post-stripping, and at 75 min to determine skin barrier recovery. Cortisol and catecholamine responses were obtained from multiple saliva and plasma samples, respectively.
RESULTS: Contrary to expectations, greater pain was associated with faster skin barrier recovery, even after controlling for demographics, mood, anxiety, and other factors. Those who reported higher pain showed faster recovery at site 2 compared to a) individuals who experienced lower pain; and b) their own recovery at site 1. Greater increase in norepinephrine (but not in cortisol) was also associated with faster recovery at site 2, and mediated the impact of pain on recovery.
DISCUSSION: Results bolster evidence that acute pain can affect immune-related processes. It is possible that acute pain may speed recovery from dermal abrasions, although pain is likely to impair recovery from more severe wounds. As pain is an important potential target for clinical intervention, further investigation of pain, stress, and healing processes is warranted.
Authors:
Jennifer E Graham; Sunmi Song; Christopher G Engeland
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2012-08-19
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of psychosomatic research     Volume:  73     ISSN:  1879-1360     ISO Abbreviation:  J Psychosom Res     Publication Date:  2012 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-11-15     Completed Date:  2013-05-03     Revised Date:  2013-12-04    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0376333     Medline TA:  J Psychosom Res     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  452-8     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Acute Pain / physiopathology*
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety / physiopathology
Depression / physiopathology
Epinephrine / analysis,  blood
Female
Humans
Hydrocortisone / analysis,  blood
Male
Norepinephrine / analysis,  blood
Saliva / chemistry
Skin / injuries,  physiopathology
Skin Physiological Phenomena*
Young Adult
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
AT002122/AT/NCCAM NIH HHS; CA16058/CA/NCI NIH HHS; M01 RR000034/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; M01-RR-0034/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; P30 CA016058/CA/NCI NIH HHS; R21 AT002122/AT/NCCAM NIH HHS; T32 AI055411/AI/NIAID NIH HHS; T32AI55411/AI/NIAID NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
WI4X0X7BPJ/Hydrocortisone; X4W3ENH1CV/Norepinephrine; YKH834O4BH/Epinephrine
Comments/Corrections

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