Document Detail


Acute effects on metabolism and appetite profile of one meal difference in the lower range of meal frequency.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  18053311     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
A gorging pattern of food intake has been shown to enhance lipogenesis and increase body weight, which may be due to large fluctuations in storage and mobilisation of nutrients. In a state of energy balance, increasing meal frequency, and thereby decreasing inter-meal interval, may prevent large metabolic fluctuations. Our aim was to study the effect of the inter-meal interval by dividing energy intake over two or three meals on energy expenditure, substrate oxidation and 24 h satiety, in healthy, normal-weight women in a state of energy balance. The study was a randomised crossover design with two experimental conditions. During the two experimental conditions subjects (fourteen normal-weight women, aged 24.4 (SD 7.1) years, underwent 36 h sessions in energy balance in a respiration chamber for measurements of energy expenditure and substrate oxidation. The subjects were given two (breakfast, dinner) or three (breakfast, lunch, dinner) meals per d. We chose to omit lunch in the two meals condition, because this resulted in a marked difference in inter-meal-interval after breakfast (8.5 h v. 4 h). Eating three meals compared with two meals had no effects on 24 h energy expenditure, diet-induced thermogenesis, activity-induced energy expenditure and sleeping metabolic rate. Eating three meals compared with two meals increased 24 h fat oxidation, but decreased the amount of fat oxidised from the breakfast. The same amount of energy divided over three meals compared with over two meals increased satiety feelings over 24 h. In healthy, normal-weight women, decreasing the inter-meal interval sustains satiety, particularly during the day, and sustains fat oxidation, particularly during the night.
Authors:
Astrid J Smeets; Margriet S Westerterp-Plantenga
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2007-12-06
Journal Detail:
Title:  The British journal of nutrition     Volume:  99     ISSN:  1475-2662     ISO Abbreviation:  Br. J. Nutr.     Publication Date:  2008 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2008-04-23     Completed Date:  2008-06-23     Revised Date:  2009-05-20    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0372547     Medline TA:  Br J Nutr     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1316-21     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Human Biology, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD, Maastricht, The Netherlands. astrid.smeets@hb.unimaas.nl
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Appetite*
Area Under Curve
Basal Metabolism*
Body Composition
Calorimetry, Indirect
Cross-Over Studies
Dietary Fats / metabolism
Energy Intake*
Energy Metabolism
Fasting
Feeding Behavior*
Female
Humans
Obesity / metabolism*,  psychology
Oxidation-Reduction
Satiation
Satiety Response
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Dietary Fats

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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