Document Detail


ACCIDENTS IN CHILDHOOD: A REPORT ON 17,141 ACCIDENTS.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  14201260     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The causes of injury to 17,141 children brought to the emergency department of a large pediatric hospital in one year were studied. The leading causes of injury were: falls, 5682; cuts or piercings, 1902; poisonings, 1597; and transportation accidents, 1368. Included in these are 587 falls on or down stairs, 401 cuts due to glass, 630 poisonings from household or workshop substances, 510 poisonings from salicylate tablets, and 449 accidents involving bicycles or tricycles. Other findings included 333 injuries to fingers or hands in doors, usually car doors; 122 instances of pulled arms; 384 ingestions and 53 inhalations of foreign bodies; 60 alleged sexual assaults, 58 chemical burns, 127 wringer injuries, and four attempted suicides. A rewarding opportunity in accident prevention exists for hospitals that undertake to compile and distribute pertinent source data.
Authors:
J A KEDDY
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Canadian Medical Association journal     Volume:  91     ISSN:  0008-4409     ISO Abbreviation:  Can Med Assoc J     Publication Date:  1964 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1965-01-01     Completed Date:  1996-12-01     Revised Date:  2011-09-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0414110     Medline TA:  Can Med Assoc J     Country:  CANADA    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  675-80     Citation Subset:  OM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Accidents*
Accidents, Traffic*
Adolescent*
Bites and Stings*
Burns*
Canada
Child*
Craniocerebral Trauma*
Eye Injuries*
Foreign Bodies*
Infant*
Poisoning*
Sports Medicine*
Statistics as Topic*
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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