Document Detail


24 years of pneumoconiosis mortality surveillance in Australia.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  17053296     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Asbestosis, silicosis and Coal Worker's Pneumoconiosis (CWP) represent three of the most important occupationally-related dust diseases in Australia. To gain a clear picture of pneumoconiosis trends over time, a 24-yr retrospective analysis of national mortality data was performed for the period 1979 to 2002. Over 1,000 pneumoconiosis-related fatalities occurred during this time, 56% of which were caused by asbestosis, 38% by silicosis and 6% by CWP. Between 1979 and 1981, silicosis accounted for 60% of all pneumoconiosis-related fatalities in Australia, followed by asbestosis (31%). By 2002 however, asbestosis was causing 78% of all fatalities, while silicosis accounted for only 19%. Asbestos-related mortality increased three-fold between 1979 and 2002, with a clear excess risk demonstrated among males. On the other hand, mortality rates for silicosis and CWP declined significantly during the same time period. Overall, this study suggests that pneumoconiosis, particularly asbestosis, continues to be an important occupational disease in Australia. Although progress has been made in reducing deaths due to occupational silicosis and CWP, asbestosis rates continue to rise, reflecting the long latency between dust exposure and clinical disease. Countries which continue to use asbestos products in the workplace should note the tragic legacy of this material within contemporary Australia.
Authors:
Derek R Smith; Peter A Leggat
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of occupational health     Volume:  48     ISSN:  1341-9145     ISO Abbreviation:  J Occup Health     Publication Date:  2006 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2006-10-20     Completed Date:  2007-01-25     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9616320     Medline TA:  J Occup Health     Country:  Japan    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  309-13     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
International Center for Research Promotion and Informatics, National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Kawasaki, Japan. smith@niih.go.jp
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Asbestos
Australia / epidemiology
Coal Mining
Female
Humans
Male
Occupational Exposure
Pneumoconiosis / epidemiology,  mortality*
Population Surveillance*
Retrospective Studies
Silicosis
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
1332-21-4/Asbestos

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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