Document Detail


17-year outcome of preterm infants with diverse neonatal morbidities: Part 2, impact on activities and participation.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23009040     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
PURPOSE: To examine functioning and participation in a diverse U.S. sample of 180 infants at age 17 years.
DESIGN AND METHODS: The World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health model framed functioning and participation domains and contextual factors. Assessment included cognition, executive functioning, academic achievement, personal functioning, community participation, and social involvement.
RESULTS: Socioeconomic status, not prematurity, impacted cognitive and academic outcomes. Across neonatal morbidities, male gender and social disadvantage are key determinants of cognitive, academic, and social functioning.
PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Interventions addressing academic and social-behavioral competencies in early school years may potentially optimize long-term preterm outcomes.
Authors:
Mary C Sullivan; Robin J Miller; Michael E Msall
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article     Date:  2012-09-12
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal for specialists in pediatric nursing : JSPN     Volume:  17     ISSN:  1744-6155     ISO Abbreviation:  J Spec Pediatr Nurs     Publication Date:  2012 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-09-26     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101142025     Medline TA:  J Spec Pediatr Nurs     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  275-87     Citation Subset:  IM; N    
Copyright Information:
© 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Affiliation:
University of Rhode Island, College of Nursing, Kingston, Rhode Island; Brown Center for the Study of Children at Risk, Women & Infants Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island.
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