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Results 201 - 250 of 811
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Dickneite Gerhard - - 2007
INTRODUCTION: Prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) is recommended for emergency reversal of oral coumarin anticoagulation. Recently, recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) has also been investigated for this purpose, although no direct comparison of PCC and rFVIIa has been reported. This study was designed to compare the effectiveness of PCC and rFVIIa for ...
Chung Evelyn M - - 2006
This study sought to compare the cutting efficiency of different diamond burs on initial use as well as during repeated use, alternating with sterilization. Long, round-end, tapered diamond burs with similar diameter, profile, and diamond coarseness (125-150 microm grit) were used. A high-torque, high-speed electric handpiece (set at 200,000 rpm) ...
Fulco Charles S - - 2006
Acetazolamide can be taken at sea level to prevent acute mountain sickness during subsequent altitude exposure. Acetazolamide causes metabolic acidosis at sea level and altitude, and increases SaO2 (arterial oxygen saturation) at altitude. The aim of the present study was to determine whether acetazolamide impairs muscle endurance at sea level ...
Loffredo Brett M - - 2006
Hypoxia elicits hematopoiesis, which ultimately improves oxygen transport to peripheral tissues. In part because of this, altitude training has been used in the conditioning of elite endurance athletes for decades, despite equivocal evidence that such training benefits subsequent sea level performance. Recently, traditional live high-train high athletic conditioning has been ...
Kuntz Kathryn Lynne - - 2006
Many researchers report that rock climbing has significant negative effects on cliff biota. Most work on climbing disturbance, however has not controlled for variation in microsite characteristics when comparing areas with and without climbing presence. Additionally, some researchers do not identify the style or difficulty level of climbing routes sampled ...
Whilby Shani - - 2006
The difference in level required to match monaural and binaural loudness of 5- and 200-ms tones was measured for listeners with normal and impaired hearing. Stimuli were 1-kHz tones presented at levels ranging from 10 to 90 dB sensation level. Sixteen listeners (eight normal and eight with losses of primarily ...
Park Hyoungki - - 2006
We investigated the conducting properties of functionalized single wall nanotubes (SWNTs) with a finite addend concentration. Robust differences are found between monovalent and divalent additions. For the former a small number of addends can significantly disrupt the ballistic conductance of nanotubes near the Fermi level. As the concentration increases the ...
Lundby Carsten - - 2006
The tight relation between arterial oxygen content and maximum oxygen uptake (Vv(o2max)within a given person at sea level is diminished with altitude acclimatization. An explanation often suggested for this mismatch is impairment of the muscle O(2) extraction capacity with chronic hypoxia, and is the focus of the present study. We ...
Hinckson E A - - 2006
Intermittent hypoxic training and discontinuous exposure to altitude were used to improve performance at sea level in elite rowers. Altitude was simulated with a newly patented device which allowed athletes to experience altitude by re-breathing oxygen-depleted expired air. Seven elite rowers (five females, two males) used inhalers for a 90-min ...
Porta A - - 2006
Global linear analysis has been traditionally performed to verify the relationship between pulse transit time (PTT) and systolic arterial pressure (SAP) at the level of their spontaneous beat-to-beat variabilities: PTT and SAP have been plotted in the plane (PTT,SAP) and a significant linear correlation has been found. However, this relationship ...
Scott Graham R - - 2006
The ability of some bird species to fly at extreme altitude has fascinated comparative respiratory physiologists for decades, yet there is still no consensus about what adaptations enable high altitude flight. Using a theoretical model of O(2) transport, we performed a sensitivity analysis of the factors that might limit exercise ...
Brändström Helge - - 2006
The catamaran HS Sleipner struck a rock and sunk in bad weather and heavy seas on 26 November 1999. Rescue efforts were provided by helicopters and other ships. A total of 68 victims were rescued alive and 16 died, mostly by drowning. Problems were encountered with evacuation, life jackets, and ...
Rodriguez-Carmona Marisa - - 2006
BACKGROUND: Both yellow-blue (YB) discrimination thresholds and macular pigment optical density (MPOD) measurements in the eye exhibit large variability in the normal population. Although it is well established that selective absorption of blue light by the macular pigment (MP) can significantly affect trichromatic colour matches, the extent to which the ...
Falk Bareket - - 2006
Oxygen supplementation may improve exercise tolerance and the physiological response to exercise in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Elevated barometric pressure at low altitude is a simple means of increasing the quantity of inspired oxygen. Our objectives were to examine the effect of natural oxygen enrichment (at the Dead Sea, 396 ...
Hsu Andrew R - - 2006
Sildenafil causes pulmonary vasodilation, thus potentially reducing impairments of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension on exercise performance at altitude. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of sildenafil during normoxic and hypoxic exercise. We hypothesized that 1) sildenafil would have no significant effects on normoxic exercise, and 2) sildenafil ...
Hinninghofen Heidemarie - - 2006
BACKGROUND: In a questionnaire survey, long-distance flying staff of a charter airline reported significantly more dyspeptic symptoms than did short-haul crewmember and ground personnel (belching: 57% vs. 37%, bloating: 51% vs. 36%). To elucidate the reason for increased frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms during long-distance flights, we investigated the effects of ...
Busnel Jean-Marc - - 2006
Narrow pH cuts of carrier ampholytes (CAs), originally designed for IEF, have been used as BGEs in CE. Their physicochemical properties, rather high buffering capacity and low conductivity, allow very efficient protein separations under high electric field strength. Due to their isoelectric properties, CA BGEs are expected to present a ...
Bauer Andreas - - 2006
The role of microvascular fluid shifts in the adaptation to hypobaric hypoxia and its contribution to the pathophysiology of AMS (acute mountain sickness) is unresolved. In a systematic prospective study, we investigated the effects of hypobaric hypoxia and physical exercise alone, and in combination, on microvascular fluid exchange and related ...
Roels B - - 2006
The effects of living and training have not been compared at different altitudes in well trained subjects. Nine international swimmers lived and trained for 13 days similarly at 1200 m (T1200) and 1850 m (T1850). The two altitude training periods were separated by six weeks of sea level training. Before ...
Merz Tobias M - - 2006
The possibility of persistent cerebral impairment due to exposure to extreme altitude and resulting hypoxic conditions is of great concern to both high altitude mountaineers and researchers. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of prolonged exposure to hypoxia on cerebral glucose metabolism, which probably precedes ...
Vuyk Jaap - - 2006
Vuyk, Jaap, Jan Van Den Bos, Kees Terhell, Rene De Bos, Ad Vletter, Pierre Valk, Martie Van Beuzekom, Jack Van Kleef, and Albert Dahan. Acetazolamide improves cerebral oxygenation during exercise at high altitude. High Alt. Med. Biol. 7:290-301, 2006.--Acute mountain sickness is thought to be triggered by cerebral hypoxemia and ...
León-Velarde Fabiola - - 2006
Highland population (HA) from the Andes, living above 3000 m, have a blunted ventilatory response to increasing hypoxia, breathe less compared to acclimatized newcomers, but more, compared to sea-level natives at sea level. Subjects with chronic mountain sickness (CMS) breathe like sea-level natives and have excessive erythrocytosis (EE). The respiratory ...
Windsor Jeremy S - - 2006
Windsor, Jeremy S., and George W. Rodway. Supplemental oxygen and sleep at altitude. High Alt. Med. Biol. 7:307-311, 2006.--The purpose of this study was to examine the effect supplemental oxygen has on the respiratory and cardiovascular system of a mountaineer during sleep at high altitude by using a novel ambulatory, ...
Hovenden Mark J - - 2006
Leaf morphology varies reliably with increasing altitude in many species, and this is generally considered to be related to temperature. Changes in irradiance with elevation may confound any relationships between a morphological character and altitude, particularly if altitude of origin affects the response to irradiance. Here we describe the interaction ...
Ziegler Alan D - - 2006
This study evaluated the effectiveness of two application rates of a coral-derived surfacing material for both traffic and nontraffic road conditions using simulated rainfall (110-120 mm h(-1) for 30-90 min) on 0.75-m (wide) x 5.0-m (long) plots of similar slope (roughly 0.1 m m(-1)). The coral is a locally available ...
Marconi Claudio - - 2006
Tibetan and Andean natives at altitude have allegedly a greater work capacity and stand fatigue better than acclimatized lowlanders. The principal aim of the present review is to establish whether convincing experimental evidence supports this belief and, should this be the case, to analyze the possible underlying mechanisms. The superior ...
Greksa Lawrence P - - 2006
Growth and development under conditions of chronic hypoxia result in a different pattern of growth in Andean highlanders than in lowlanders. Growth at high altitude results in a small (1 to 4 cm) delay in linear growth, with most, if not all, of the delay probably established at or soon ...
Moore Lorna G - - 2006
John T. (Jack) Reeves' science is reviewed across the 37 years of his research career at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, a period which occupied approximately half his remarkable life. His contributions centered on understanding the inter-relatedness as well as the underlying mechanisms controlling the various components of ...
Astériou Trias - - 2006
Hyaluronidase and high levels of hyaluronan are found together in tumours. It is highly likely that hyaluronidase activity controls the balance between high molecular mass hyaluronan and oligosaccharides, and thus plays an important role in cancer development. The hyaluronan hydrolysis catalysed by bovine testicular hyaluronidase was studied as a model. ...
Schmid J-P - - 2006
OBJECTIVES: To assess the safety and cardiopulmonary adaptation to high altitude exposure among patients with coronary artery disease. METHODS: 22 patients (20 men and 2 women), mean age 57 (SD 7) years, underwent a maximal, symptom limited exercise stress test in Bern, Switzerland (540 m) and after a rapid ascent ...
Robach Paul - - 2006
The "living high-training low" model (LHTL), i.e., training in normoxia but sleeping/living in hypoxia, is designed to improve the athletes performance. However, LHTL efficacy still remains controversial and also little is known about the duration of its potential benefit. This study tested whether LHTL enhances aerobic performance in athletes, and ...
Pavlidis Mitrofanis - - 2005
BACKGROUND: To evaluate the short- and long-term effects of high-altitude hypobaric hypoxia on macula morphology and function during ascents, acclimatizations, and descents between 500 m and 5,650 m, macula function was evaluated in three healthy climbers of a trekking expedition. METHODS: Macula physiology was tested with multifocal electroretinography (MF ERG), ...
Mata-L?pez Rosario - - 2005
Gorgoderina festoni n. sp. is described from the urinary bladder of Gastrophryne usta, Leptodactylus labialis, L. melanonotus and Bufo marinus from localities at low altitude in the states of Veracruz, Oaxaca, Guerrero and Colima, Mexico. This species differs from most other species of the genus by a combination of the ...
Brugniaux Julien V - - 2006
The "living high-training low" (LHTL) model is frequently used to enhance aerobic performance. However, the clinical tolerance and acclimatization process to this intermittent exposure needs to be examined. Forty one athletes from three federations (cross-country skiers, n=11; swimmers, n=18; runners, n=12) separately performed a 13 to 18-day training at the ...
Alley Richard B - - 2005
Future sea-level rise is an important issue related to the continuing buildup of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. The Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, with the potential to raise sea level approximately 70 meters if completely melted, dominate uncertainties in projected sea-level change. Freshwater fluxes from these ice sheets also may ...
Eldridge Marlowe W - - 2006
Strenuous exercise may be a significant contributing factor for development of high-altitude pulmonary edema, particularly at low or moderate altitudes. Thus we investigated the effects of heavy cycle ergometer exercise (90% maximal effort) under hypoxic conditions in which the combined effects of a marked increase in pulmonary blood flow and ...
Tsianos G - - 2006
The aim of the study was to determine the factors affecting a climber's ability to ascend Mont Blanc using a number of variables collected at the Gouter Hut (3,817 m) before and after an attempted ascent on the Mont Blanc summit. Subjects (n=285) were tested at 3,817 m prior to ...
Araneda O F - - 2005
Lung oxidative stress (OS) was explored in resting and in exercising subjects exposed to moderate and high altitude. Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) was collected under field conditions in male high-competition mountain bikers performing a maximal cycloergometric exercise at 670 m and at 2,160 m, as well as, in male soldiers ...
Marconi Claudio - - 2005
High-altitude Tibetans undergo a pattern of adaptations to chronic hypoxia characterized, among others, by a more efficient aerobic performance compared with acclimatized lowlanders. To test whether such changes may persist upon descent to moderate altitude, oxygen uptake of 17 male Tibetan natives lifelong residents at 3500-4500 m was assessed within ...
Meisch Max V - - 2005
Against caged field-collected adults of Anopheles quadrimaculatus, optimized aerial applications of ANVIL 10+10 at 18.4 ml (1.63 g active ingredient)/0.4 ha produced a mean mortality of 92% at 1, 12, and 24 h after treatment. These trials were conducted with 7 stacked passes applied 1,067 m upwind of the target ...
Schoene Robert B - - 2005
Under most conditions, the lungs compensate for the stresses of illness to ensure adequate acquisition of oxygen. Even with exposure to high altitude, the lungs' adaptations ensure that this process takes place. This process is challenged by global hypoxia, especially if there is impairment in the three processes needed for ...
Rostrup Egill - - 2005
Acute normobaric hypoxia as well as longstanding hypobaric hypoxia induce pronounced physiological changes and may eventually lead to impairment of cerebral function. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of hypoxia on the cerebral activation response as well as to explore possible structural changes as measured ...
Valverde J Cerezo - - 2005
The demand feeding rhythms of sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.) maintained at rest or subjected to exercise (increase in swimming activity) as a result of an induced water current are compared. Both sea bass kept individually and in group (4 and 8 individuals) shifted their food demands towards the exercise ...
Cymerman Allen - - 2005
INTRODUCTION: Oculometrics have been shown to be responsive to acute hypoxemia. We investigated whether oculometrics could be used as an objective index of a hypoxic effect on the central nervous system (CNS) during altitude acclimatization. We hypothesized that oculomotor reflexes [pupil diameter (PD), constriction amplitude (CA), constriction latency (CL), and ...
Reboul Cyril - - 2005
INTRODUCTION: This study questioned the effect of living and training at moderate altitude on aortic vasoreactivity. Considering that chronic hypoxia exposure and endurance training are able to generate opposite effects on the systemic vascular reactivity, it was hypothesized that endurance training benefits on the vascular function could be limited by ...
Lundby C - - 2005
This study was performed to investigate the effects of intermittent hypoxic exposure on blood and exercise parameters. Eight sea level residents were exposed to 2 h daily stimulus to 4100 m altitude in a hypobaric chamber for a total of 14 days. Exercise performance was evaluated at sea level before ...
Imray C H E - - 2005
The effects of submaximal and maximal exercise on cerebral perfusion were assessed using a portable, recumbent cycle ergometer in nine unacclimatized subjects ascending to 5,260 m. At 150 m, mean (SD) cerebral oxygenation (rSO2%) increased during submaximal exercise from 68.4 (SD 2.1) to 70.9 (SD 3.8) (P < 0.0001) and ...
Henderson Gideon M - - 2005
Earth's climate can change substantially on time scales of 1000 years or so, but given the time it takes for an ice sheet to grow or melt, it has been unclear whether continental ice sheets-and hence global sea levels-mirror these rapid changes. In his Perspective, Henderson discusses the report by ...
Shetty Shwetha K - - 2005
OBJECTIVES: To compare the palatine rugae pattern of Mysorean and Tibetan subjects, to assess the predominant palatine rugae pattern in Mysorean and Tibetan population, and to determine the uniqueness of palatine rugae pattern in an individual. MATERIALS: Maxillary study models of 60 subjects each (30 males and 30 females) of ...
Brutsaert Tom D - - 2005
Andean high-altitude (HA) natives have a low (blunted) hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR), lower effective alveolar ventilation, and lower ventilation (VE) at rest and during exercise compared with acclimatized newcomers to HA. Despite blunted chemosensitivity and hypoventilation, Andeans maintain comparable arterial O(2) saturation (Sa(O(2))). This study was designed to evaluate the ...
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