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Trip Pia P Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Institute for Cardiovascular Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The - - 2012
Patients affected by pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) show a typical pattern of abnormalities on cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET). However, CPET is not routinely used as a screening method. We discuss a patient with hereditary PAH in whom CPET revealed onset of disease. Furthermore, we show that the abnormalities observed can ...
Ha Sung-Min - - 2012
To determine the most effective exercise to specifically activate the scapular posterior tilting muscles by comparing muscle activity generated by different exercises (wall facing arm lift, prone arm lift, backward rocking arm lift, backward rocking diagonal arm lift). Repeated-measure within-subject intervention. The subjects were 20 healthy young men and women. ...
Almeida Jeeser Alves - - 2012
Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) are one of the main animal models used for studying the effects of exercise on hypertension. Therefore, the determination of adequate intensity has been essential for secure and optimized exercise prescriptions concerning hypertensive subjects. This study aimed to identify the MLSS in SHR by using a ...
Agarwal Deepmala - - 2012
This study sought to investigate the effects of physical detraining on blood pressure (BP) and cardiac morphology and function in hypertension, and on pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (PICs and AIC) and oxidative stress within the brain of hypertensive rats. Hypertension was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by delivering AngiotensinII for ...
Klaus Fabienne - - 2011
Adult hippocampal neurogenesis, i.e. the formation of new neurons within the existing neuronal network of the dentate gyrus, is subject to modulation by internal and external factors. Among them, voluntary physical exercise is one of the best investigated positive stimulators of neurogenesis in laboratory rodents. Straightforward translation of the observed ...
Tarnus Evelyne - - 2011
The maximal rate of O(2) consumption (Vo(2max)) constitutes one of the oldest fitness indexes established for the measure of cardiorespiratory fitness and aerobic performance. Procedures have been developed in which Vo(2max) is estimated from physiological responses during submaximal exercise. Generally, Vo(2max) is estimated using the classical renowned Astrand-Ryhming test. In ...
Archer T - - 2011
Archer T, Fredriksson A, Johansson B. Exercise alleviates Parkinsonism: clinical and laboratory evidence. Acta Neurol Scand: 2011: 123: 73-84. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S. The present review examines the putative benefits for individuals afflicted with Parkinsonism, whether in the clinical setting or in the animal laboratory, accruing from ...
Swennes Alton G - - 2011
Routine laboratory procedures can be stressful for laboratory animals. We wanted to determine whether human handling of adult rabbits could induce a degree of habituation, reducing stress and facilitating research-related manipulation. To this end, adult New Zealand white rabbits were handled either frequently or minimally. After being handled over 3 ...
Sharifirad Gholamreza G Department of Health Education & Health Promotion, School of Health, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, - - 2011
Background: To investigate of physical activity distribution bases on stages of change among Isfahan University of Medical Sciences central part of Iran. Methods: Exercise behavior stages of change construct questionnaire were collected from 504 participants by using a convenience sample in May 2010. Results: 73.8% of subjects were in earlier ...
Bérard Philippe - - 2010
The metrological evaluation is indispensable to objectively prove the capability of the medical laboratory to perform analysis. The comparison of analytical performances regarding the accuracy and the reproducibility of the available methods is a real interest of international comparison exercises, especially as the participation to comparison exercises is becoming a ...
de Paula Paula - - 2012
High altitude training has become a mainstay in endurance sports, with live high-train low as the current protocol of choice. Athletes either live or sleep in artificial or natural hypoxic conditions with the aim to increase serum erythropoietin concentrations, which are thought to improve maximum oxygen uptake and thus exercise ...
Möller Thomas - - 2010
Abnormal right ventricular systolic pressure response (RVPR) during exercise has previously been demonstrated in patients with septal defects of the heart. Our study investigated whether moderate altitude affects RVPR and oxygen saturation during rest and exercise in patients with surgically closed septal defects. Ten patients with surgically closed heart septal ...
Webb James T - - 2010
The existence of a general influence of exercise on the incidence of decompression sickness (DCS) has been known for more than a half-century. However, quantification of the effect has not been done for several reasons, including isolation of exercise as the only variable. The DCS database at Brooks City-Base, TX, ...
Harrold Marc W - - 2010
To develop exercises that allow pharmacy students to apply foundational knowledge discussed in a first-professional year (P1) biochemistry course to specific disease states and patient scenarios. A pharmacy practice laboratory exercise was developed to accompany a lecture sequence pertaining to purine biosynthesis and degradation. The assignment required students to fill ...
Castellani John W - - 2010
Hypoxia often causes body water deficits (hypohydration, HYPO); however, the effects of HYPO on aerobic exercise performance and prevalence of acute mountain sickness (AMS) at high altitude (ALT) have not been reported. We hypothesized that 1) HYPO and ALT would each degrade aerobic performance relative to sea level (SL)-euhydrated (EUH) ...
Darst Jeffrey R - - 2010
Data assessing the effect of altitude on Fontan haemodynamics are limited to experimental models and case reports. Both suggest a detrimental impact. This study describes exercise performance in patients with Fontan circulation and matched controls at a low altitude versus at sea level. We sought to assess the impact of ...
Gaunt Bryce W - - 2010
Active-assistive range of motion exercises to gain shoulder elevation have been subdivided into gravity-minimized and upright-assisted exercises, yet no study has evaluated differences in muscular demands. Compared with gravity-minimized exercises, upright-assisted exercises will generate larger electromyographic (EMG) activity. Compared with all active-assistive exercises, upright active forward elevation will generate more ...
Bloch Konrad E - - 2010
RATIONALE: Quantitative data on ventilation during acclimatization at very high altitude are scant. Therefore, we monitored nocturnal ventilation and oxygen saturation in mountaineers ascending Mt. Muztagh Ata (7,546 m). OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether periodic breathing persists during prolonged stay at very high altitude. METHODS: A total of 34 mountaineers (median ...
Vogt Michael - - 2010
Altitude training has become very popular among athletes as a means to further increase exercise performance at sea level or to acclimatize to competition at altitude. Several approaches have evolved during the last few decades, with "live high-train low" and "live low-train high" being the most popular. This review focuses ...
Lomax Mitch - - 2010
INTRODUCTION: Specific inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has been shown to significantly attenuate the fall in arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) during exhaustive exercise while breathing a hypoxic gas mixture of 14% oxygen. The aim of the current study was to assess the impact of IMT on resting SpO2 over a range ...
Burtscher Martin - - 2010
Annually, more than 100 million tourists are attracted by the mountainous areas around the world. On the one hand, leisure time activities at altitude may well contribute to the well-established beneficial effects of exercise; on the other hand, these activities are also associated with a relatively high risk of death. ...
Drust B - - 2010
Altitude poses physiological challenges to the sports participant in excess of those encountered at sea level. The main problem is hypoxia and the reduction in oxygen transport capacity, which is linked to the fall in alveolar oxygen tension. Training at altitude is imperative as preparation for competing there in aerobic ...
Lafleur J E - - 2010
Acetazolamide is useful for acclimatizing to high altitude. How long it should be taken, and the physiological consequences of stopping it have not been thoroughly studied. We investigated the effect of acetazolamide cessation on exercise oxygenation at different altitudes and durations of use. Three groups were studied: group 1 acclimatized ...
Racinais Sebastien - - 2010
The aim of this study was to test the short-term effects of using hypoxic rooms before a simulated running event. Thirteen subjects (29 +/- 4 years) lived in a hypoxic dormitory (1,800 m) for either 2 nights (n = 6) or 2 days + nights (n = 7) before performing ...
Sinha Sanchari - - 2010
Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species have been reported to be increased due to hypobaric hypoxia. It was hypothesized that lowlanders are more susceptible to protein nitration, lipid peroxidation and DNA damage at high altitude than highlanders and formation of these biomarkers may have strong correlation with oxygen consumption. Male volunteers ...
Castell Linda M - - 2010
Prolonged, exhaustive exercise frequently leads to an increased incidence of upper respiratory tract illness (URTI) which is linked to transient immunodepression. We investigated potential biochemical markers of stress and fatigue, and URTI symptoms as a surrogate of immunodepression, in US Marines undergoing intensive winter training at altitude. Selected plasma amino ...
Faulhaber Martin - - 2010
In this study, we examined the effects of a pre-acclimatization programme on endurance performance at moderate altitude using a resting intermittent hypoxia protocol. The time-trial performance of 11 cyclists was determined at low altitude (600 m). Athletes were randomly assigned in a double-blind fashion to the hypoxia or the control ...
de Vries S T - - 2010
Background. To evaluate the safety and effects of high altitude on exercise level and heart rate in patients with coronary artery disease compared with healthy controls.Methods. Eight patients with a history of an acute myocardial infarction (ejection fraction >5%) with a low-risk score were compared with seven healthy subjects during ...
Butler Patrick J - - 2010
Up to half the world's population of bar-headed geese (Anser indicus) migrate between central Asia and India and fly between 5000 m and 9000 m above sea level as they cross the Himalayas. The partial pressures of oxygen at these altitudes are, respectively, about 50% and 30% those at sea ...
Schommer Kai - - 2010
In a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study, we tested a 4-week program in normobaric hypoxia that is commercially offered for the prevention of acute mountain sickness (AMS). Twenty-two male and 18 female healthy subjects [mean age 33 +/- 7 (SD) years] exercised 70 min, 3 x /week for 3 weeks on ...
Windsor Jeremy S - - 2010
An ascent to altitude places considerable demands on the cardiovascular system. Changes in the rate, rhythm, and morphology of the electrocardiogram reflect the fall in the partial pressure of inspired oxygen (PiO2) and the adaptive responses that the human body makes. The effect of hypoxia on the autonomic nervous system ...
Muza Stephen R - - 2010
For many low-altitude (<1500 m) residents, their travel itineraries may cause them to ascend rapidly to high (>2400 m) altitudes without having the time to develop an adequate degree of altitude acclimatization. Prior to departing on these trips, low-altitude residents can induce some degree of altitude acclimatization by ascending to ...
Hooper T J - - 2010
INTRODUCTION: The incidence of Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) is increasing. In a military context our current operational areas include mountainous regions with the implications of AMS including loss of operational tempo and logistical overstretch. Oxygen saturation and heart rate variability have in some studies been predictive of AMS while in ...
Dehnert Christoph - - 2010
Tourism to high altitude is very popular and includes elderly people with both manifest and subclinical coronary heart disease (CHD). Thus, risk assessment regarding high altitude exposure of patients with CHD is of increasing interest, and individual recommendations are expected despite the lack of sufficient scientific evidence. The major factor ...
Millet Gregoire P - - 2010
New methods and devices for pursuing performance enhancement through altitude training were developed in Scandinavia and the USA in the early 1990s. At present, several forms of hypoxic training and/or altitude exposure exist: traditional 'live high-train high' (LHTH), contemporary 'live high-train low' (LHTL), intermittent hypoxic exposure during rest (IHE) and ...
Levett Denny Z H - - 2010
The physiological responses to hypoxaemia and cellular hypoxia are poorly understood, and inter-individual differences in performance at altitude and outcome in critical illness remain unexplained. We propose a model for exploring adaptation to hypoxia in the critically ill: the study of healthy humans, progressively exposed to environmental hypobaric hypoxia (EHH). ...
Katayama Keisho - - 2010
Recent studies have shown that exercise training at moderate altitude or in moderate hypoxia improved glycemic parameters. From these data, it has been supposed that endurance exercise in moderate hypoxia affects substrate utilization and that exposure to moderate hypoxia in combination with exercise may be utilized as part of metabolic ...
Billat Veronique L - - 2010
The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mountaineering experience decreases the net oxygen cost of uphill walking (OCw) on steep mountain trails and in ice and snow conditions. OCw was measured during an ascent of Mont Blanc in eight experienced alpinists and eight non-alpinists who were ...
Pellegrino Riccardo - - 2010
Peribronchial edema has been proposed as a mechanism enhancing airway responses to constrictor stimuli. Acute exposure to altitude in nonacclimatized lowlanders leads to subclinical interstitial pulmonary edema that lasts for several days after ascent, as suggested by changes in lung mechanics. We, therefore, investigated whether changes in lung mechanics consistent ...
Flueck Martin - - 2010
Human muscle operates along a continuum of power output, which is set through bioenergetic and anatomical principles. In turn, environmental and intrinsic factors during contractile work exert pronounced control over muscle performance by instructing muscle remodelling. This phenotypic control is specifically indicated with intense exercise at altitude, when extra strain ...
Fulco Charles S - - 2009
Partial acclimatization resulting from staging at moderate altitude reduces acute mountain sickness during rapid exposure to higher altitudes (e.g., 4300 m). Whether staging also benefits endurance performance has not yet been scientifically evaluated. PURPOSE: Determine the effectiveness of staging at 2200 m on time trial (TT) performance of unacclimatized sea-level ...
Chapman Robert F - - 2010
Winter sports events routinely take place at low to moderate altitudes, and nearly all Winter Olympic Games have had at least one venue at an altitude >1000 m. The acute and chronic effects of altitude can have a substantial effect on performance outcomes. Acutely, the decline in oxygen delivery to ...
Cai Ming-Chun - - 2010
Cardiac muscle adaptation is essential for maintaining physical capacity after ascending to high altitude. This study examines the effects of high altitude training on myocardial metabolic enzyme activity and composition of alpha-myosin heavy chain (MHC). Rats were randomly divided into normobaric sedentary (NS) and training (NT) groups, and hypobaric sedentary ...
Gassmann Max - - 2009
Numerous factors involved in general homeostasis are able to modulate ventilation. Classically, this comprises several kind of molecules, including neurotransmitters and steroids that are necessary for fine tuning ventilation under different conditions such as sleep, exercise, and acclimatization to high altitude. Recently, however, we have found that erythropoietin (Epo), the ...
Fischler Manuel - - 2009
RATIONALE: Whether pulmonary hypertension at high altitude limits exercise capacity remains uncertain. OBJECTIVES: To gain further insight into the pathophysiology of hypoxia induced pulmonary hypertension and the resulting reduction in exercise capacity, we investigated if the reduction in hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstrictive response with corticosteroids or phosphodiesterase-5 inhibition improves exercise capacity. ...
Beidleman Beth A - - 2009
PURPOSE: This study examined the effect of 1 wk of normobaric intermittent hypoxic exposure (IHE) combined with exercise training on endurance performance at a 4300-m altitude (HA). METHODS: Seventeen male lowlanders were divided into an IHE (n = 11) or SHAM (n = 6) group. Each completed cycle endurance testing ...
Heinicke Ilmar - - 2009
Oxidative stress occurs at altitude, and physical exertion might enhance this stress. In the present study, we investigated the combined effects of exercise and moderate altitude on redox balance in ten endurance exercising biathletes, and five sedentary volunteers during a 6-week-stay at 2,800 m. As a marker for oxidative stress, ...
Lalande Sophie - - 2009
The reduced arterial oxygen tension at high altitude impairs the ability to work. Acetazolamide improves arterial oxygen saturation (SaO(2)) by increasing ventilation but is associated with an increased work and cost of breathing. Depending on the settings, sildenafil can also increases SaO(2) possibly through a reduction in pulmonary hypertension and ...
Clark Sally A - - 2009
The aim of this study was to determine the time course of changes in haemoglobin mass (Hb(mass)) in well-trained cyclists in response to live high:train low (LHTL). Twelve well-trained male cyclists participated in a 3-week LHTL protocol comprising 3,000 m simulated altitude for ~14 h/day. Prior to LHTL duplicate baseline ...
Kelly Paul T - - 2009
INTRODUCTION: Exposure to altitude invariably involves some form of physical activity. There are limited data available to help predict the response to activity at altitude in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of the present study was to investigate the response to acute altitude exposure at rest ...
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