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Results 551 - 600 of 812
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Al-Hajjaj M S - - 1994
In high altitude areas, inspired atmosphere oxygen decrease proportionally to the vertical distance from sea level. Population in these areas some adaptive mechanisms to cope with the relatively hypoxic environment. This study compares populations who live in highland areas (2500 meters above sea level) with those in lowland areas (close ...
Kumar K V - - 1994
A two-period, crossover trial was conducted in the hypobaric chamber on human subjects to compare the influence of inflight exercise (experimental) and restricted activity (control) on altitude decompression sickness (DCS) during simulated extravehicular activities. Out of 39 pairs (total of 78 exposures), 4 cases of DCS occurred under control and ...
Fulco C S - - 1994
The purpose of this study was to determine if caffeine (CAF) could enhance exercise performance at high altitude (HA). Eight males (17 to 24 years) performed two submaximal endurance tests to exhaustion (ETX) while cycling at approximately 80% of their altitude-specific maximal aerobic power during each of three phases: 1) ...
Sancier K M - - 1994
Electroacupuncture According to Voll (EAV) was used to monitor the effects of qigong practice on therapeutic balancing of subjects. In EAV the electrical conductance of the skin above individual acupuncture points is measured using low voltage and current. Diagnosis depends on measuring the relative electrical conductance and its time dependence. ...
Martínez-Ballarín E - - 1994
High altitude has always intrigued physiologists because of the remarkable ability of man to adapt to the hostile environment. Despite numerous studies examining the physiological alterations occurring during exercise after exposure to hypoxia and the adaptative effects of sustained residence at altitude, several issues remain unresolved. The aim of investigation ...
Rawal S B - - 1994
Using radioactive iodine, the effect of 1 month's yogic exercises has been investigated on the thyroid function of subjects resident at sea level (SL) specially after their exposure to high altitude (HA). The results have been compared with a group of SL subjects who underwent physical training (PT) exercises for ...
Hansen J M - - 1994
The mechanism of proteinuria at high altitude is unclear. Renal function and urinary excretion rate of albumin (Ualb) at rest and during submaximal exercise and transcapillary escape rate of 125I-labeled albumin (TERalb) were investigated in 12 normal volunteers at sea level and after rapid and passive ascent to 4,350 m. ...
Slooten J - - 1994
This study describes habitual physical activity (HPA) of Bolivian boys living at different altitudes and from different socioeconomic status. The boys were living at high altitude (HA) in La Paz (4000 m) and at low altitude (LA) in Santa Cruz (400 m). At both altitudes samples of 10- to 12-year-old ...
Bedu M - - 1994
The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of chronic high altitude hypoxia and socioeconomic status on the anaerobic power, developed during short-term maximal exercises, of prepubertal Bolivian boys. We studied 67 prepubertal boys (9-12.6 years) at high altitude in La Paz (3600 m, Bolivia); 23 were from ...
Fellmann N - - 1994
The aim of this paper was to analyze the effects of chronic hypoxia and socioeconomic level on blood lactate concentrations obtained after maximal exercise and a 30-s Wingate test in 145 Bolivian boys (mean age: 10.8 years). Among the boys studied at high altitude (HA) (La Paz, 3600m) and at ...
Antezana A M - - 1994
Plasma norepinephrine (NE) concentration increases with altitude exposure while maximal heart rate (HR) and chronotropic response to isoproterenol (IP) are blunted. Downregulation of cardiac beta-adrenergic receptors (beta-AR) has been evoked to explain this phenomenon. Chronotropic response was studied at extreme altitude in 10 subjects (4 women, 6 men; aged 35 ...
Rao R K - - 1994
The effects of cholecystokinin (CCK) fragments and Asp-Tyr-D-Phe-Gly-Trp-[N-Me]Nle-Asp-Phe-NH2 1(SNF 9007), a synthetic CCK analog which binds with high affinity to CCKB and opioid delta receptors, were evaluated in isolated sheets of mouse ileum mounted in Ussing flux chambers. Serosal, but not mucosal, administration of cholecystokinin octapeptide-sulfated [CCK8(s)] and cholecystokinin tetrapeptide ...
Mazzeo R S - - 1994
We examined the extent to which epinephrine influences blood lactate adjustments to exercise during both acute (AC) and chronic (CH) high-altitude exposure. Eleven male sea level residents were divided into a control group (n = 5) receiving a placebo or a drug group (n = 6) receiving 240 mg/day of ...
Alexander J K - - 1994
In the past, it has been assumed that some basic physiologic responses to altitude, exposure in coronary patients are comparable to those in normal young subjects. In fact there are similar changes in sympathetic activation, heart rate, and blood pressure early after ascent, with decrements in plasma volume, cardiac output, ...
Sakai A - - 1994
We compared the effects of exercise training at a low (610 m) altitude with those at moderate (1,500 m) altitude on arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) and pulse rate (PR) between two groups of men: five subjects in the low altitude group (LG), and five other subjects in the moderate-altitude group ...
Savourey G - - 1994
To study the physiological effects of pre-adaptation to high altitude, seven subjects were submitted to acclimatization at 4350 m followed by intermittent acclimation in a low barometric pressure chamber (5000 m to 8500 m). The subjects then spent 25 days in the Himalayas. Ventilatory and cardiac responses were studied during ...
Day R W - - 1994
At higher elevations, alveolar hypoxia increases pulmonary vascular resistance and may limit the cardiac output of individuals without a subpulmonary ventricle. Thus, we reviewed the outcome of definitive palliation for tricuspid atresia and other forms of single ventricle in 60 consecutive Fontan patients living at a mean elevation of 1,370 ...
Nuss R - - 1993
Sickle cell trait has been associated with an unexplained increased risk of sudden death during military basic training. Previous studies of cardiopulmonary function in persons with sickle cell trait at sea level or after brief exposure to moderately high altitude have not shown significant abnormalities. To determine whether cardiopulmonary function ...
Kayser B - - 1993
The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the net maximal blood lactate accumulation ([La]max) during heavy exercise in lowlanders acclimatized to chronic hypoxia may be limited by the reduced bicarbonate stores. Six men [age 32 +/- 4 (SD) yr] performed supramaximal exercise until voluntary exhaustion ...
Rock P B - - 1993
To determine the effect of altitude acclimatization on plasma levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) during submaximal exercise and its relationship with renin and aldosterone, seven male volunteers aged 17-23 yr exercised to exhaustion on a cycle ergometer at 80-85% of their maximum O2 uptake at sea level (SL; 50 ...
Maresh C M - - 1993
Ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were examined in six low- (LAN) and eight moderate- (MAN) altitude natives during exercise at their residence (home) altitude (366 m and 2,200 m, respectively) and 1-4 wk later following 2-d decompression to 4,270 m (447 mm Hg). Cardiorespiratory, plasma lactate, and differentiated RPE measures ...
Kaufman D - - 1993
Electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings were obtained from nine male subjects at sea level and again following rapid ascent to high altitude (4300 meters) at 0900, 1600, and 1830 h. Electroencephalographic data were subjected to Fast Fourier Transformation and analyzed for beta, spindle, alpha, theta, delta, and total amplitudes. Total amplitude increased ...
Colice G L - - 1993
Plasma renin activity (PRA) and aldosterone increase with exercise. Acute hypoxia interferes with this hormonal response to exercise, but the effects of chronic or intermittent hypoxia on exercise-induced hormonal changes are not well understood. The hormonal response to exercise was studied in two groups of subjects who were expected to ...
Schmidt W - - 1993
The present study was performed to evaluate the effects of chronic inspiratory hypoxia and its combination with physical exercise on plasma erythropoietin concentration ([EPO]). Eight natives from the Bolivian Plateau were investigated at 3,600 m above sea level at rest as well as during and up to 48 h after ...
Ferrarese C - - 1993
The published information on glutamate levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and modifications in neurological disorders is controversial. In the present study, we demonstrated a metabolic instability of glutamate in untreated CSF and a spurious elevation of its levels by the current methods of CSF acidification. These findings may explain the ...
Wilson R C - - 1993
1. The effect of residence at altitude on the perception of breathlessness after return to sea level was examined in normal subjects. Breathlessness (Borg scale), minute ventilation, respiratory frequency, tidal volume, 'oxygen pulse' (oxygen consumption/heart rate) and the ventilatory equivalent for oxygen (minute ventilation/oxygen consumption) were measured at exercise (cycle-ergometer) ...
Obert P - - 1993
The aim of this work was to analyze the effects of altitude and socioeconomic and nutritional status on maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and anaerobic power (P) in 11-yr-old Bolivian boys. At both high (HA) (3,600 m) and low (LA) (420 m) altitudes, the boys were divided into high (HA1, n ...
Nisijima K - - 1993
Homovanillic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were determined twice in nine cases of neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) during the active phase. During the test period, three cases received no dantrolene and six cases received dantrolene prior to the second CSF examination. In the ...
Stoneham M D - - 1993
Changes in the arterial haemoglobin-oxygen saturation (SaO2) of the blood, in the blood pressure and in the heart rate, were monitored in subjects performing static exercise at an altitude of 3,600 metres before and after an acclimatization period of 28 days during an expedition to the Bolivian Andes. It was ...
Vasankari T J - - 1993
The effect of similar prolonged exercise on hormonal changes was studied at sea level and at moderate altitude. Four cross-country skiers participated in a 30-km race and five biathlonists in a 20-km race at sea level in Finland and during altitude training and racing at 1650 m in Les Saisies, ...
Selland M A - - 1993
To determine if spirometric changes reflect early high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) formation, we measured the FVC, FEV1, and FEF25-75 serially during the short-term period following simulated altitude exposure (4,400 m) in eight male subjects, four with a history of HAPE and four control subjects who had never experienced HAPE. Three ...
Bigard A X - - 1993
The effects of two levels of protein intake on muscle performance and energy metabolism were studied in humans submitted to repeated daily sessions of prolonged exercise at moderate altitude. For this purpose, 29 healthy males, were exposed to seven successive stages of ski-mountaineering at altitudes between 2500 and 3800 m, ...
Zhuang J - - 1993
Lifelong high-altitude residents of North and South America acquire blunted hypoxic ventilatory responses and exhibit decreased ventilation compared with acclimatized newcomers. The ventilatory characteristics of Himalayan high-altitude residents are of interest in the light of their reportedly lower hemoglobin levels and legendary exercise performance. Until recently, Sherpas have been the ...
Bigard A X - - 1992
The biochemical, histochemical, and structural changes induced by endurance training and long-term exposure to high altitude were studied in the diaphragm muscle of rats exposed to simulated altitude (HA: n = 16; Pb = 62 kPa, 463 Torr; 4000 m) and compared to animals maintained at sea-level (SL: n = ...
Hackney A C - - 1992
The purpose of this study was to examine changes in select anaerobic and aerobic dependent physical performance tasks in U.S. Marines exposured to field operations at moderate altitude. The subjects (N = 16) completed Wingate anaerobic power, submaximal aerobic cycle ergometry, hand grip strength, and push-up tests on three separate ...
Young P M - - 1992
The reasons for the reduced exercise capacities observed at high altitudes are not completely known. Substrate availability or accumulations of lactate and ammonium could have significant roles. As part of Operation Everest II, peak oxygen uptakes were determined in five normal male volunteers with use of progressively increasing cycling work ...
Green H J - - 1992
To determine whether the working muscle is able to sustain ATP homeostasis during a hypoxic insult and the mechanisms associated with energy metabolic adaptations during the acclimatization process, seven male subjects [23 +/- 2 (SE) yr, 72.2 +/- 1.6 kg] were given a prolonged exercise challenge (45 min) at sea ...
Huang S Y - - 1992
Cerebral blood flow increases with acute exposure to high altitude, but the effect of hypoxia on the cerebral circulation at rest and during exercise appears influenced by the duration of high-altitude exposure. To determine whether internal carotid artery flow velocity increased with exercise in long-term residents of high altitude and ...
Serebrovskaya T V - - 1992
The hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory drive, gas exchange, blood lactate and pyruvate concentrations, acid-base balance, and physical working capacity were determined in three groups of healthy males: 17 residents examined at sea level (group I), 24 sea-level natives residing at 1,680-m altitude for 1 yr and examined there (group II), ...
Terrados N - - 1992
To study the effects of training at moderate altitude on muscle metabolism; we defined the lowest altitude which affected the aerobic capacity in man, and we studied the differences between training at an altitude of 2300 m and at sea level, both at the same relative (to the VO2max) and ...
Green H J - - 1992
Residence at extreme altitude results in pronounced reductions in muscle mass and the cross-sectional area of the slow and fast twitch fibre types. The reductions in muscle contractile proteins appear not to be accompanied by significant alterations in the proportion of the major fibre types and consequently in the myosin ...
Coudert J - - 1992
Anaerobic metabolism is usually evaluated by the determination of the anaerobic capacity and the maximal anaerobic mechanical external power (Wmax). Conflicting results are reported on anaerobic capacity evaluated by maximal oxygen deficit and debt, and maximal blood lactate concentration during acute or chronic hypoxia (acclimatized subjects). Data on muscle biopsies ...
Kumar K V - - 1992
This study was conducted to examine the effects of exercise prior to decompression on the incidence of altitude decompression sickness (DCS). In a balanced, two-period, crossover trial, 39 healthy individuals (29 males, 10 females) of mean (S.D.) age 32.5 (7.7) years and body mass index 23.7 (3.4) were each exposed ...
Richalet J P - - 1992
Climbing Mount Everest needs an acclimatization period of 3 to 4 weeks between 3000 and 6000 m. In order to reduce this period of time spent in dangerous conditions, an experience of pre-acclimatization was performed with 5 elite alpinists (4 male, 1 female), aged 30 +/- 4 yrs (mean +/- ...
Sutton J R - - 1992
Operation Everest II was designed to examine the physiological responses to gradual decompression simulating an ascent of Mt Everest (8,848 m) to an inspired PO2 of 43 mmHg. The principal studies conducted were cardiovascular, respiratory, muscular-skeletal and metabolic responses to exercise. Eight healthy males aged 21-31 years began the "ascent" ...
Rathat C - - 1992
The variability in sensitivity to acute mountain sickness among individuals is a phenomenon well known to physicians and high altitude alpinists. The measurement of cardiac and respiratory responses to hypoxia (FIO2 = 0.115) at rest and during exercise (50% VO2max) allows the detection of those subjects who are more liable ...
Perry M E - - 1992
Official physical training records of personnel stationed at intermediate altitude (elevation 5,280 feet) for at least 1 year were reviewed to gauge the effect of altitude on 2-mile running performance. An average of 48 additional seconds (a 5% increase in time) was required to complete the run compared to sea-level ...
Milledge J S - - 1992
The physiological effect of altitude hypoxia, in the absence of exercise, is a sodium and water diuresis with decrease in plasma and extra-cellular volumes. Plasma aldosterone concentrations (PAC) are reduced but plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) levels are modestly increased. Day-long exercise at low altitude has almost opposite effects on ...
Appenzeller O - - 1992
Some peptides are released with stress. We therefore examined effects of different exercise stress at low and moderate altitudes and after heat stress on beta-endorphin and endothelin in the human circulation. We also assessed longitudinally the effects of chronic exertion on beta-endorphin and the relationship to melatonin secretion in well-trained ...
Fellmann N - - 1992
In 7-15-yr-old children living in La Paz (Bolivia, altitude 3,700 m) (HA): 1) Maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) varies from 35 to 45 ml.min-1.kg-1 and maximal heart rate from 188 to 194 beats.min-1. These values are lower than those of their counterparts at low altitude (LA) by 10-20% and 10-15 b.min-1, ...
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