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Laidre Mark E - - 2010
Animals from invertebrates to humans benefit from information conspecifics make available, including information produced inadvertently. While inadvertent social information may frequently be exploited in nature, experiments have rarely been conducted in the wild to examine how such information helps animals in their natural ecology. Here I report a series of ...
Metcalfe Janet J Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, United States. - - 2010
In this article we suggest a relation between people's metacognitively guided study time allocation strategies and animal foraging. These two domains are similar insofar as people use specific metacognitive cues to assist their study time allocation just as other species use cues, such as scent marking. People decline to study ...
Teubner Brett J W BJ Department of Biology and Center for Behavioral Neuroscience, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30302-4010, United - - 2010
Neurochemicals that stimulate food foraging and hoarding in Siberian hamsters are becoming more apparent, but we do not know if cessation of these behaviors is due to waning of excitatory stimuli and/or the advent of inhibitory factors. Cholecystokinin (CCK) may be such an inhibitory factor as it is the prototypic ...
Smedal B - - 2009
Honeybee (Apis mellifera) society is characterized by a helper caste of essentially sterile female bees called workers. Workers show striking changes in lifespan that correlate with changes in colony demography. When rearing sibling sisters (brood), workers survive for 3-6 weeks. When brood rearing declines, worker lifespan is 20 weeks or ...
James Alex - - 2010
A large number of observational and theoretical studies have investigated animal movement strategies for finding randomly located food items. Many of these studies have claimed that a particular strategy is advantageous over other strategies or that the spatial distribution of the food items affects the search efficiency. Here, we study ...
van Overveld Thijs - - 2010
Personality differences measured under standardized lab-conditions are assumed to reflect differences in the way individuals cope with spatio-temporal changes in their natural environment, but few studies have examined how these are expressed in the field. We tested whether exploratory behaviour in a novel environment predicts how free-living individual great tits ...
Menzel F - - 2010
1. The huge diversity of symbiotic associations among animals and/or plants comprises both mutualisms and parasitisms. Most symbioses between social insect species, however, involve social parasites, while mutual benefits have been only suspected for some parabiotic associations - two colonies that share a nest. 2. In the rainforest of Borneo, ...
Kurvers Ralf H J M - - 2010
Animals foraging in groups can either search for food themselves (producing) or search for the food discoveries of other individuals (scrounging). Tactic use in producer-scrounger games is partly flexible but individuals tend to show consistency in tactic use under different conditions suggesting that personality might play a role in tactic ...
Mitani Yoko - - 2010
During their long migrations through the Pacific, northern elephant seals, Mirounga angustirostris, never haul out on land and they rarely spend more than a few minutes at a time at the surface. They are almost constantly making repetitive, deep dives, raising the question of when do they rest? One type ...
Henshaw Ian - - 2009
Long-distance migrants regularly pass ecological barriers, like the Sahara desert, where extensive fuel loads are necessary for a successful crossing. A central question is how inexperienced migrants know when to put on extensive fuel loads. Beside the endogenous rhythm, external cues have been suggested to be important. Geomagnetic information has ...
Hernandez-Aguilar R Adriana - - 2009
This paper reports on a 20-month study of chimpanzee nesting patterns in Issa, Ugalla, western Tanzania. Ugalla is one of the driest, most open, and seasonal habitats where chimpanzees are found. The methods used were ethoarchaeological, as the chimpanzees were not habituated and behavioural observations were rare. Systematic data on ...
Mitri Sara - - 2009
Reliable information is a crucial factor influencing decision-making and, thus, fitness in all animals. A common source of information comes from inadvertent cues produced by the behavior of conspecifics. Here we use a system of experimental evolution with robots foraging in an arena containing a food source to study how ...
Angelier Frédéric - - 2009
In seabirds, variations in stress hormone (corticosterone; henceforth CORT) levels have been shown to reflect changing marine conditions and, especially, changes in food availability. However, it remains unclear how CORT levels can be mechanistically affected by these changes at the individual level. Specifically, the influence of food acquisition and foraging ...
Gil Mariana M Free University of Berlin, Department of Biology/Chemistry/Pharmacy, Institute of Biology - Neurobiology, Koenigin-Luise-Strasse 28/30, 14195 Berlin, Germany. - - 2009
In this study, we asked whether honeybees learn the sign and magnitude of variations in the level of reward. We designed an experiment in which bees first had to forage on a three-flower patch offering variable reward levels, and then search for food at the site in the absence of ...
LeBlanc Blaise W - - 2009
In the United States, high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) has become a sucrose replacement for honey bees and has widespread use as a sweetener in many processed foods and beverages for human consumption. It is utilized by commercial beekeepers as a food for honey bees for several reasons: to promote brood ...
Salwiczek Lucie H LH Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, United - - 2009
Recent studies on the food-caching behavior of corvids have revealed complex physical and social skills, yet little is known about the ontogeny of food caching in relation to the development of cognitive capacities. Piagetian object permanence is the understanding that objects continue to exist even when they are no longer ...
Stulp Gert - - 2009
Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) engage in a variety of cache-protection strategies to reduce the chances of cache theft by conspecifics. Many of these strategies revolve around reducing visual information to potential thieves. This study aimed to determine whether the jays also reduce auditory information during caching. Each jay was given ...
Desvars Amélie - - 2009
Pteropus seychellensis comorensis is the only Pteropodidae bat species on the island of Mayotte (Comoros Archipelago), and most aspects of its biology are unknown. In order to catch this large bat, we used a simple and low-cost method, consisting of raised mist nets that were set close to foraging sites. ...
Hengeveld Geerten M - - 2009
The concentrations of resources in forage are not perfectly balanced to the needs of an animal, and food species differ in these concentrations. Under many circumstances, animals should thus forage on multiple food species to attain the maximum and most balanced intake of several resources. In this article we present ...
Lozada M - - 2009
In this study, we explore how an invasive social wasp, Vespula germanica (F.), deals with contextual changes while searching for a food source that is no longer available. Four experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of different degrees of context modification on wasp behavior. Learning sessions consisted of a ...
Schmolke Amelie - - 2009
Colonies of many ant species are not confined to a single nest but inhabit several dispersed nests, a colony organization referred to as polydomy. The benefits of polydomy are not well understood. It has been proposed that increased foraging efficiency promotes polydomy. In a spatially explicit individual-based model, I compare ...
Elliott Susan E - - 2009
Bees feed almost exclusively on nectar and pollen from flowers. However, little is known about how food availability limits bee populations, especially in high elevation areas. Foraging distances and relationships between forager densities and resource availability can provide insights into the potential for food limitation in mobile consumer populations. For ...
Champlin Tracey B - - 2009
Few attempts have been made to experimentally address the extent to which temporal or spatial variation in food availability influences avian habitat use. We used an experimental approach to investigate whether bird use differed between treated (arthropods reduced through insecticide application) and control (untreated) forest canopy gaps within a bottomland ...
Kraan Casper - - 2009
1. Whether intertidal areas are used to capacity by shorebirds can best be answered by large-scale manipulation of foraging areas. The recent overexploitation of benthic resources in the western Dutch Wadden Sea offers such an 'experimental' setting. 2. We review the effects of declining food abundances on red knot Calidris ...
Moore Darrell - - 2009
Forager honey bees can associate the time of day with the presence of food at locations outside the hive. It is thought that this time-memory enables the bee to make a spatio-temporal match between its behavior and floral nectar secretion rhythms. Despite a long tradition of research, the mechanisms by ...
Lupfer-Johnson Gwen - - 2009
In 2 experiments, dwarf hamsters (Phodopus campbelli) were trained to find palatable foods in an open field. The location of each food patch remained the same throughout each experiment, and only 1 food was available per day. Once subjects had been trained to find each food in its unique location, ...
Dussutour Audrey - - 2009
Studies on nonsocial insects have elucidated the regulatory strategies employed to meet nutritional demands [1-3]. However, how social insects maintain the supply of an appropriate balance of nutrients at both a collective and an individual level remains unknown. Sociality complicates nutritional regulatory strategies [4-6]. First, the food entering a colony ...
Schorkopf Dirk Louis P - - 2009
Like ants and termites some species of stingless bees (Meliponini), which are very important pollinators in the tropics, use pheromone trails to communicate the location of a food source. We present data on the communicative role of mandibular gland secretions of Meliponini that resolve a recent controversy about their importance ...
Oh Dong-Chan DC Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, - - 2009
Fungus-growing ants engage in mutualistic associations with both the fungus they cultivate for food and actinobacteria (Pseudonocardia spp.) that produce selective antibiotics to defend that fungus from specialized fungal parasites. We have analyzed one such system at the molecular level and found that the bacterium associated with the ant Apterostigma ...
Grüter Christoph - - 2009
The honeybee (Apis mellifera) waggle dance, whereby dancing bees communicate the location of profitable food sources to other bees in the hive, is one of the most celebrated communication behaviours in the animal world. Dance followers, however, often appear to ignore this location information, the so-called dance language, after leaving ...
Humber Jessica M - - 2009
Pine siskins (Carduelis pinus) frequently forage at known high quality food supplies such as backyard feeders. In this field study, pine siskins visited backyard feeders of differing colour and spatial position. The three feeders contained varying amounts of food in a ratio of 3:2:1. The birds quickly distributed their visits ...
Godvik Inger Maren Rivrud - - 2009
Animals selecting habitats often have to consider many factors, e.g., food and cover for safety. However, each habitat type often lacks an adequate mixture of these factors. Analyses of habitat selection using resource selection functions (RSFs) for animal radiotelemetry data typically ignore trade-offs, and the fact that these may change ...
Teubner Brett J W BJ Department of Biology and Center for Behavioral Neuroscience, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30302-4010, United - - 2009
Siberian hamsters markedly reduce their body/lipid mass ( approximately 20-45%) in short 'winter-like' days (SD). Decreases in body/lipid mass associated with food deprivation or lipectomy result in increases in foraging and food hoarding. When at their SD-induced body/lipid mass nadir, food hoarding is not increased despite their decreases in body/lipid ...
Falibene Agustina - - 2009
Modulation of liquid feeding-rate would allow insects to ingest more food in the same time when this was required. Ants can vary nectar intake rate by increasing sucking pump frequency according to colony requirements. We analysed electrical signals generated by sucking pump activity of ants during drinking solutions of different ...
Roth Timothy C - - 2009
Environmental conditions may provide specific demands for memory, which in turn may affect specific brain regions responsible for memory function. For food-caching animals, in particular, spatial memory appears to be important because it may have a direct effect on fitness via the accuracy of cache retrieval. Animals living in more ...
Lenz Michael - - 2009
A year-long field experiment showed that Reticulitermes flavipes attacked and used single stakes and wooden stake bundles differently in two habitats that varied in alternative forage. In both habitats, the number of termites present in single stakes and stake-bundles increased with stake resource size, and the number of larvae recorded ...
Broom Mark - - 2009
Kleptoparasitism, the stealing of food from one animal by another, is a common natural phenomenon that has been modelled mathematically in a number of ways. The handling process of food items can take some time and the value of such items can vary depending upon how much handling an item ...
Kaun Karla R - - 2009
Successful foraging is necessary for procurement of nutritional resources essential for an animal's survival. Maintenance of foraging and food acquisition is dependent on the ability to balance food intake and energy expenditure. This review examines the role of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) as a regulator of foraging behaviour, food acquisition, ...
Pereira R A - - 2009
The cell provisioning and oviposition process (POP) is a unique characteristic of stingless bees (Meliponini), in which coordinated interactions between workers and queen regulate the filling of brood cells with larval resources and subsequent egg laying. Environmental conditions seem to regulate reproduction in stingless bees; however, little is known about ...
Menezes C - - 2009
We describe a case of a spontaneously established mixed colony of two species of stingless bees. The host colony of Scaptotrigona depilis, an aggressive bee that forms large colonies, was invaded by workers of Nannotrigona testaceicornis, a smaller bee that forms small colonies. The host colony and the invading species ...
Richard Freddie-Jeanne - - 2009
Neotropical leaf-cutting ants (tribe Attini) live in obligate symbiosis with fungus they culture for food. To protect themselves and their fungus garden from pathogens, they minimize the entry of microorganisms through mechanical and chemical means. In this study, focusing on the species Acromyrmex subterraneus and A. octospinosus, (Hymeoptera: Formicidae). Self- ...
Van Haastert Peter J M - - 2009
Food searching strategies of animals are key to their success in heterogeneous environments. The optimal search strategy may include specialized random walks such as Levy walks with heavy power-law tail distributions, or persistent walks with preferred movement in a similar direction. We have investigated the movement of the soil amoebae ...
Young Lindsay C - - 2009
When searching for prey, animals should maximize energetic gain, while minimizing energy expenditure by altering their movements relative to prey availability. However, with increasing amounts of marine debris, what once may have been 'optimal' foraging strategies for top marine predators, are leading to sub-optimal diets comprised in large part of ...
Ribeiro Pedro Leite - - 2009
The trails formed by many ant species between nest and food source are two-way roads on which outgoing and returning workers meet and touch each other all along. The way to get back home, after grasping a food load, is to take the same route on which they have arrived ...
Buffin Aurélie - - 2009
Food sharing is vital for a large number of species, either solitary or social, and is of particular importance within highly integrated societies, such as in colonial organisms and in social insects. Nevertheless, the mechanisms that govern the distribution of food inside a complex organizational system remain unknown. Using scintigraphy, ...
Mailleux Anne-Catherine - - 2009
The decision for a Lasius niger forager to lay a chemical trail and launch recruitment to a food source is governed by an internal individual threshold. The value of this threshold triggering chemical communication is not set by the maximal capacity of the crop. Actually, trail-laying ants are still able ...
Manser, Martha B.
In many bird species with biparental care for young in the nest, hungry chicks beg repeatedly and parents adjust their feeding rate to the call rate of young. Repetitive calling also occurs in fledglings and in some mammals where offspring follow provisioners. It is not yet clear whether, in mobile ...
Barbosa, Andrés
Several mechanisms can explain individual differences in foraging behaviour, such as variation in predation risk between patches, variation in the ability of individuals to detect or escape from predators, variation between individuals in their requirement for food, the quality and abundance of food in different patches, phenotypic variation giving rise ...
Barluenga, Marta
We studied the effect of daily body mass increase on the foraging preferences of two tit species, crested tit, Parus cristatus and blue tit, P. caeruleus, contrasting in morphology and behaviour. We found that both species show a diurnal increase in body mass during winter. Using an experiment with feeders ...
Pereyra, Telmo
In the tropical regions of the world, intercropping is mostly associated with food grain production, whereas it is receiving increased attention in temperate regions as a means of efficient forage production. The aim of this work was to determine the relative yield of aerial biomass in alfalfa or lucerne (Medicago ...
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