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Tonello Lucio L University of Human Sciences and Technology (LUdeS University), Lugano, - - 2014
The pathogenesis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis includes autoimmunity involving thyroid antigens, autoantibodies, and possibly cytokines. It is unclear what role plays Hsp60, but our recent data indicate that it may contribute to pathogenesis as an autoantigen. Its role in the induction of cytokine production, pro- or anti-inflammatory, was not elucidated, except ...
Lee Sei Young SY Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul, - - 2014
To determine the effects of nonthermal plasma (NTP) induced by helium (He) alone or He plus oxygen (O₂) on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell death in anaplastic thyroid cancer cells. NTP was generated in He alone or He plus O₂ blowing through a nozzle by applying ...
Harazono Yosuke Y Departments of Oncology and Pathology, School of Medicine, Wayne State University, and Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, - - 2014
Cancer cells survive escaping normal apoptosis and the blocks in apoptosis that keep cancer cells alive are promising candidates for targeted therapy. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is, a member of the lectin family, which is involved in cell growth, adhesion, proliferation and apoptosis. It remains elusive to understand the role of Gal-3 ...
Antonelli Alessandro A Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Via Savi 10, I-56126 Pisa, University of Pisa, Italy. Electronic address: - - 2014
Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) result from a dysregulation of the immune system leading to an immune attack on the thyroid. AITD are T cell-mediated organ-specific autoimmune disorders. The prevalence of AITD is estimated to be 5%; however, the prevalence of antithyroid antibodies may be even higher. The AITD comprise two ...
Ehlers Margret M Division for Specific Endocrinology, Medical Faculty, University of Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf, Germany. Electronic address: - - 2014
Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) is the most common autoimmune disease in humans frequently leading to hypothyroidism. HT is characterized by a cellular immune response with lymphatic infiltration of the thyroid gland by T and B cells, as well as by a humoral immune response leading to specific antibody production. The synchronous ...
Vizioli Maria Grazia MG Molecular Mechanism Unit, Department of Experimental Oncology and Molecular Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. Cell Proliferation Group, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Campus, London, - - 2014
Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is a robust and sustained antiproliferative response to oncogenic stress and constitutes an efficient barrier to tumour progression. We have recently proposed that OIS may be involved in the pathogenesis of thyroid carcinoma by restraining tumour progression as well as the transition of well differentiated to more ...
Ward Laura Sterian LS Laboratory of Cancer Molecular Genetics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Campinas (FCM-Unicamp), Rua Tessália Vieira de Camargo 126, Barão Geraldo, 13083-970 Campinas, SP, - - 2014
The association between thyroid cancer and thyroid inflammation has been repeatedly reported and highly debated in the literature. In fact, both molecular and epidemiological data suggest that these diseases are closely related and this association reinforces that the immune system is important for thyroid cancer progression. Innate immunity is the ...
Morales-Corraliza Jose J Center for Dementia Research, Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY 10962, USA. - - 2013
Although anti-human β-amyloid (Aβ) immunotherapy clears brain β-amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD), targeting additional brain plaque constituents to promote clearance has not been attempted. Endogenous murine Aβ is a minor Aβ plaque component in amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic AD models, which we show is ∼3%-8% of the total ...
Imanishi Toshio - - 2012
Atherogenesis progresses through lipid core expansion and macrophage accumulation at the plaque, leading to fibrous cap rupture. Plaque rupture occurs in the plaque fissuring at one point, which ultimately brings the platelets into contact with the content of the lipid core, and the blood coagulation factors together with tissue factor. ...
Owens A Phillip AP - - 2012
Hyperlipidemia leads to the formation of oxidized LDL (oxLDL), vessel dysfunction, atherosclerotic disease, and ultimately to plaque rupture and thrombosis. OxLDL induces tissue factor (TF) expression in various cell types, including monocytes and macrophages. High levels of TF are present in atherosclerotic plaques and this represents that major source of ...
Dasari Prasad - - 2012
Severe P. falciparum malaria evolves through the interplay between capillaric sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes, deregulated inflammatory responses and hemostasis dysfunction. Upon rupture, each parasitized erythrocyte releases not only infective merozoites, but also the digestive vacuole (DV), a membrane-bounded organelle containing the malaria pigment hemozoin. We report that the intact organelle, ...
Guillot-Sestier M-V - - 2012
The cellular prion protein (PrP(c)) undergoes α-secretase-derived processing by disintegrins. This cleavage occurs within the 106-126 putative toxic domain of PrP(c), yielding two complementary N- and C-terminal fragments referred to as N1 and C1, respectively. Here we review our recent data showing that these two PrP(c)-derived products harbor distinct p53-dependent ...
Williams Howell J - - 2012
The macrophage is exquisitely sensitive to its microenvironment, as demonstrated primarily through in vitro study. Changes in macrophage phenotype and function within the atherosclerotic plaque have profound consequences for plaque biology, including rupture and arterial thrombosis leading to clinical events such as myocardial infarction. We review the evidence for dynamic ...
Gui Ting - - 2012
Cardiovascular disease, a leading cause of mortality in developed countries, is mainly caused by atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease. Macrophages, which differentiate from monocytes that are recruited from the blood, account for the majority of leukocytes in atherosclerotic plaques. Apoptosis and the suppressed clearance of apoptotic macrophages (efferocytosis) are associated ...
Tribouillard-Tanvier Déborah - - 2012
Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathy diseases are typically characterized by deposition of abnormally folded partially protease-resistant host-derived prion protein (PrPres), which is associated with activated glia and increased release of cytokines. This neuroinflammatory response may play a role in transmissible spongiform encephalopathy pathogenesis. We previously reported that brain homogenates ...
Bessen Richard A - - 2012
In this study, we investigated the role of damage to the nasal mucosa in the shedding of prions into nasal samples as a pathway for prion transmission. Here, we demonstrate that prions can replicate to high levels in the olfactory sensory epithelium (OSE) in hamsters and that induction of apoptosis ...
Mattei Vincenzo - - 2011
We examined the possibility that cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) plays a role in the receptor-mediated apoptotic pathway. We first found that CD95/Fas triggering induced a redistribution of PrP(C) to the mitochondria of T lymphoblastoid CEM cells via a mechanism that brings into play microtubular network integrity and function. In particular, ...
Iken Saci - - 2011
Several hurdles must be overcome in order to achieve efficient and safe immunotherapy against conformational neurodegenerative diseases. In prion diseases, the main difficulty is that the prion protein is tolerated as a self protein, which prevents powerful immune responses. Passive antibody therapy is effective only during early, asymptomatic disease, well ...
Westwell-Roper Clara - - 2011
Islets from patients with type 2 diabetes exhibit β cell dysfunction, amyloid deposition, macrophage infiltration, and increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. We sought to determine whether human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), the main component of islet amyloid, might contribute to islet inflammation by recruiting and activating macrophages. Early ...
Newsom Denise M - - 2011
Scrapie is a prion-associated transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) of sheep and goats, and frequently serves as a comparative model for other prion diseases, such as chronic wasting disease and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. TSEs are unique neurologic disorders that do not appear to be accompanied by robust systemic immunologic responses. mRNA ...
Peng Shan-Ying - - 2011
Context: Pain-relieving plaster (PRP) is a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) that has been widely used with satisfactory results in the treatment of some diseases related to inflammation, such as bruises, chronic arthritis. Objective: The mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory actions of PRP are investigated in this study for the first time. ...
Stefanova Nadia - - 2011
Toll-like receptors (TLRs) mediate innate immunity, and their dysregulation may play a role in α-synucleinopathies, such as Parkinson's disease or multiple system atrophy (MSA). The aim of this study was to define the role of TLR4 in α-synuclein-linked neurodegeneration. Ablation of TLR4 in a transgenic mouse model of MSA with ...
Cao Jun-Jun - - 2011
Recently, an interaction between neurodegenerative processes and the innate and adaptive immune responses has been increasingly recognized. Activation of microglia, infiltration of peripheral T lymphocytes, and T-cell interaction with microglia may strongly affect the progression of Parkinson's disease (PD) both in patients and in animal models of the disease. Here, ...
Mangano Emily N - - 2011
Exposure to environmental contaminants, particularly pesticides, may be an important etiological factor in Parkinson's disease (PD); and evidence suggests a role for microglia-dependent inflammatory and oxidative processes in nigrostriatal pathology induced by such toxins. Yet, the events mediating microglial activation and their effects are not fully known. To this end, ...
Xiang Bei - - 2011
Our previous study reported that cathepsin L may contribute to the death of dopaminergic neurons in rodent model of Parkinson's disease (PD). In this study we detected the changes in the expression of lysosomal cathepsin L in cellular models of PD. In human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, treatment with 6-hydroxydopamine caused ...
Mangano E N - - 2011
Parkinson's disease (PD) has been linked to exposure to a variety of chemical (e.g., pesticides) and inflammatory agents, which may act cumulatively over time. Finding novel means of limiting pathology associated with toxin exposure would have tremendous clinical importance. To this end, we assessed whether the hematopoietic trophic cytokine, granulocyte ...
Kong Xiang-Chen - - 2011
Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play an essential role in various neurodegenerative diseases. Manipulation of upregulation of HSPs in cells has been demonstrated to provide a therapeutic strategy to counteract the misfolding and aggregation of proteins that resulted in neurodegenerative disease. Our previous studies have shown that FLZ, a synthetic novel ...
Alvarez-Erviti Lydia L Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QX, UK. - - 2011
The neurodegenerative process in Parkinson's disease (PD) is accompanied by the presence of a neuroinflammatory response, which has been suggested as one of the principal components involved in PD progression. In this report we assessed the inflammatory potential of alpha-synuclein, a protein central to PD pathogenesis, released by neurons on ...
Liu Zhaohui - - 2011
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative movement disorder characterized by selective loss of dopaminergic neurons and the presence of Lewy bodies. The pathogenesis of PD remains incompletely understood, but it appears to involve both genetic susceptibility and environmental factors. Treatment for PD that prevents neuronal death in the dopaminergic ...
Ferrari Carina C - - 2011
Peripheral inflammation triggers exacerbation in the central brain's ongoing damage in several neurodegenerative diseases. Systemic inflammatory stimulus induce a general response known as sickness behaviour, indicating that a peripheral stimulus can induce the synthesis of cytokines in the brain. In Parkinson's disease (PD), inflammation was mainly associated with microglia activation ...
Farooqui Tahira - - 2011
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative movement disorder of unknown etiology. PD is characterized by the progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, depletion of dopamine in the striatum, abnormal mitochondrial and proteasomal functions, and accumulation of α-synuclein that may be closely associated with pathological and clinical abnormalities. ...
Altmeppen Hermann C - - 2011
The cellular prion protein (PrPC) fulfils several yet not completely understood physiological functions. Apart from these functions, it has the ability to misfold into a pathogenic scrapie form (PrPSc) leading to fatal transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Proteolytic processing of PrPC generates N- and C-terminal fragments which play crucial roles both in ...
Wang Hsin-Hui - - 2011
Peritonitis is the most serious complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD). We previously showed that high levels of interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-18 in PD effluents (PDE) during the early phase of peritonitis correlated with a predominant Type 1 immune response and a favorable outcome in PD-related peritonitis. To further clarify the ...
Jaisin Yamaratee - - 2011
Oxidative stress (OS) plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is a neurotoxin used to induce oxidative cell death of dopaminergic neurons in experimental models of PD. Curcumin I, or diferuloylmethane is a pure compound isolated from Curcuma longa Linn. that has been reported ...
da Fonseca Denise Morais - - 2011
periodontal disease (PD) and airway allergic inflammation (AL) present opposing inflammatory immunological features and clinically present an inverse correlation. However, the putative mechanisms underlying such opposite association are unknown. Balb/C mice were submitted to the co-induction of experimental PD (induced by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans oral inoculation) and AL [induced by sensitization ...
Shamri Revital R Division of Allergy and Inflammation, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, - - 2011
Eosinophils are innate immune leukocytes found in relatively low numbers within the blood. Terminal effector functions of eosinophils, deriving from their capacity to release their content of tissue-destructive cationic proteins, have historically been considered primary effector mechanisms against specific parasites, and are likewise implicated in tissue damage accompanying allergic responses ...
Yamada Tomohiro - - 2011
Acute inflammation in healthy individuals is self-limiting and has an active termination program. The mechanisms by which acute inflammation is resolved are of interest. In murine zymosan-induced peritonitis, we found that eosinophils are recruited to the inflamed loci during the resolution phase of acute inflammation. In vivo depletion of eosinophils ...
Garro Ana P - - 2011
Experimental Cryptococcus neoformans infection in rats has been shown to have similarities with human cryptococcosis, revealing a strong granulomatous response and a low susceptibility to dissemination. Moreover, it has been shown that eosinophils are components of the inflammatory response to C. neoformans infections. In this in vitro study, we demonstrated that ...
Ye Bu-Qing BQ Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, - - 2010
Directional migration of leukocytes is an essential step in leukocyte trafficking during inflammatory responses. However, the molecular mechanisms governing directional chemotaxis of leukocytes remain poorly understood. The Slit family of guidance cues has been implicated for inhibition of leuocyte migration. We report that Clara cells in the bronchial epithelium secreted ...
Yang Eun Ju - - 2011
Hydroquinone (HQ) is a benzene metabolite that is involved in hematopoiesis via its accumulation into bone marrow. HQ also acts as a toxic agent that influences various immune responses. Both neutrophils and eosinophils function as important leukocytes in immunological regulation and immune diseases. In this study, we examined the toxic ...
Navarro Susanna - - 2010
We analyze the effect of ECP on primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) and astrocytes in an effort to understand the role of ECP in the eosinophil-induced neurotoxicity. We have shown that ECP induces dose-dependent cell death in both CGCs and astrocytes. The effect of ECP action on cell ...
Okano M - - 2011
Cite this as: M. Okano, T. Fujiwara, T. Haruna, S. Kariya, S. Makihara, T. Higaki and K. Nishizaki, Clinical & Experimental Allergy, 2011 (41) 171-178. SUMMARY: Background Fungi and/or Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxins (SEs) may participate in the pathogenesis of eosinophilic inflammation in cases of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP). ...
Maneechotesuwan Kittipong - - 2010
BACKGROUND: We have previously shown that inhaled corticosteroids activate indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO) activity through increased IL-10 secretion. Statins might enhance the anti-inflammatory effects of corticosteroids. OBJECTIVE: In a double-blind study we added simvastatin to patients with mild asthma receiving a low dose of inhaled budesonide and evaluated sputum eosinophil ...
Melo Rossana C N RC Laboratory of Cellular Biology, Department of Biology, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, UFJF, Juiz de Fora, MG, - - 2010
Secretion is a fundamental cell process underlying different physiological and pathological events. In cells from the human immune system such as eosinophils, secretion of mediators generally occurs by means of piecemeal degranulation, an unconventional secretory pathway characterized by vesicular transport of small packets of materials from the cytoplasmic secretory granules ...
Melo Rossana C N RC Laboratory of Cellular Biology, Department of Biology, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, UFJF, Juiz de Fora, MG, Brazil. - - 2010
Mechanisms governing secretion of proteins underlie the biologic activities and functions of human eosinophils, leukocytes of the innate immune system, involved in allergic, inflammatory, and immunoregulatory responses. In response to varied stimuli, eosinophils are recruited from the circulation into inflammatory foci, where they modulate immune responses through the release of ...
Wang Lian-ming LM Department of Laboratory Diagnostics, Fourth Affiliated Hospital, Harbin Medical University, Nangang District, Harbin, - - 2011
Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the mucosa and is associated with excess TH₂ cytokines, eotaxin, prostaglandin D₂ (PGD₂) and eosinophilia in the lungs. Previous studies have emphasized that the N-terminal peptide of annexin 1 (peptide Ac2-26) can inhibit mast cell degranulation, antigen-induced eotaxin release as well as the ...
Terrier Benjamin - - 2010
Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is characterized by systemic vasculitis and blood and tissue eosinophilia. Blood eosinophilia correlates with disease activity, and activated T cells from CSS patients are predominantly T helper 2 (Th2). Interleukin (IL)-25 has been shown to link innate and adaptive immunity by enhancing Th2 cytokine production. We sought ...
Balla Keir M - - 2010
Eosinophils are granulocytic leukocytes implicated in numerous aspects of immunity and disease. The precise functions of eosinophils, however, remain enigmatic. Alternative models to study eosinophil biology may thus yield novel insights into their function. Eosinophilic cells have been observed in zebrafish but have not been thoroughly characterized. We used a ...
Zepeda Nadia - - 2010
After an intraperitoneal infection of mice with Taenia crassiceps metacestodes, peritoneal inflammatory cells labeled with fluoresceinated MoAb anti-mouse were analyzed by flow cytometry. Apoptosis was studied by annexin A/PI, TUNEL assays, DNA laddering, caspase-3 activity, and electron microscopy. An important continuous decrease of CD4+, CD8+ and CD19+ lymphocytes, and an ...
Stolarski Bartosz B Division of Immunology, Infection and Inflammation, Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United - - 2010
IL-33 has emerged as an important mediator in the immunopathogenesis of allergy and asthma. However, the role of IL-33 in eosinophil-mediated inflammation has not been fully explored. In this article, we report that IL-33 directly stimulates eosinophil differentiation from CD117(+) progenitors in an IL-5-dependent manner. Although resting eosinophils expressed moderate ...
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