Search Results
Results 151 - 200 of 1974
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 >
Takahashi-Nakaguchi Azusa - - 2010
The morula-stage embryo of the polyembryonic egg-larval parasitoid Copidosoma floridanum forms outside the host embryo and secondarily invades the host body. Electron microscopic analyses of cellular interactions between the extraembryonic syncytium of the parasitic morula and the host embryonic epithelial cells showed that morula penetration into the host embryo did ...
Castro Felipe D - - 2010
The effects of dissolved oxygen tension during bacterial growth and acclimation on the cell surface properties and biochemical composition of the bacterial pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Yersinia enterocolitica are characterized. Three experimental techniques are used in an effort to understand the influence of bacterial growth and acclimation conditions on ...
Novik Veronica - - 2010
Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of infectious gastroenteritis in industrialized nations. Its ability to enter and survive within nonphagocytic cells is thought to be very important for pathogenesis. However, little is known about the C. jejuni determinants that mediate these processes. Through an extensive transposon mutagenesis screen, we have ...
Bisson-Boutelliez C C Laboratoire de Bactériologie-UMR CNRS 7565, Faculté de Médecine, Nancy Université, Nancy, - - 2010
Desulfovibrio are sulfate-reducing anaerobic gram-negative rods that have been proposed as potential periodontopathogens. We investigated the capacity of Desulfovibrio to invade epithelial cells and induce cytokine secretion from these cells. Desulfovibrio strains were co-cultured with KB cells and counts of intracellular bacteria evaluated up to 3 days after infection. Desulfovibrio ...
Agarwal Vaibhav - - 2010
Streptococcus pneumoniae, a human pathogen, recruits complement regulator factor H to its bacterial cell surface. The bacterial PspC protein binds Factor H via short consensus repeats (SCR) 8-11 and SCR19-20. In this study, we define how bacterially bound Factor H promotes pneumococcal adherence to and uptake by epithelial cells or ...
Cruz Andreia - - 2012
The effect of tributyltin (TBT) on growth and metabolic activity of three estuarine bacteria with different TBT resistance profiles was investigated in an organic-rich culture medium (TSB) and in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) buffer. Exposure to TBT was assessed by determining its effect on growth (OD(600 nm) measurement), bacterial productivity ...
Kalman Daniel - - 2010
Pathogens such as Listeria have been used to define host factors regulating actin dynamics, including the Arp2/3 complex. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Serio et al. (2010) use Rickettsia to identify a new complex, based on profilin, which regulates actin dynamics in normal cells and which may ...
Sakurai Atsuo - - 2010
Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus (GAS)) is a pathogen that invades non-phagocytic host cells, and causes a variety of acute infections such as pharyngitis. Our group previously reported that intracellular GAS is effectively degraded by the host-cell autophagic machinery, and that a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin, streptolysin O (SLO), is associated with ...
Kleijn J Mieke - - 2010
In this paper we explored the use of an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to follow the development of electrochemically active biofilms on electrodes. With this technique it should be possible to monitor simultaneously the increase in biomass and the current generated by the electrogenic bacteria in the biofilm. We ...
Sinha Joy J Department of Chemistry and Center for Fundamental and Applied Molecular Evolution, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, - - 2010
A major goal of synthetic biology is to reprogram cells to perform complex tasks. Here we show how a combination of in vitro and in vivo selection rapidly identifies a synthetic riboswitch that activates protein translation in response to the herbicide atrazine. We further demonstrate that this riboswitch can reprogram ...
Severson Kari M - - 2010
Intestinal bacteria drive the formation of lymphoid tissues, and in rabbit, bacteria also promote development of the preimmune Ab repertoire and positive selection of B cells in GALT. Previous studies indicated that Bacillus subtilis promotes B cell follicle formation in GALT, and we investigated the mechanism by which B. subtilis ...
Asare Rexford R Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Louisville College of Medicine, Louisville, KY 40292, - - 2010
Arthropod vectors are important vehicles for transmission of Francisella tularensis between mammals, but very little is known about the F. tularensis-arthropod vector interaction. Drosophila melanogaster has been recently developed as an arthropod vector model for F. tularensis. We have shown that intracellular trafficking of F. tularensis within human monocytes-derived macrophages ...
- - 2010
News:Ethanol biofuels from orange peels - Targeting leukaemia's gene addiction - Pea-derived solar cells - HIV is a kick in the head - Nano-scale DNA reader - Membrane in black - Cheese improves the immune response of elderly - Synthetic proteins built from standard parts - Therapeutic proteins produced in ...
Feng Du - - 2010
Exosomes play important roles in many physiological and pathological processes. However, the exosome-cell interaction mode and the intracellular trafficking pathway of exosomes in their recipient cells remain unclear. Here, we report that exosomes derived from K562 or MT4 cells are internalized more efficiently by phagocytes than by non-phagocytic cells. Most ...
Hörtnagl Paul - - 2010
We assessed the physicochemical properties of the surface microlayer (SML: first 900 mum) and its underlying water (ULW: 0.2-0.5-m depth) and compared the composition and activity of their bacterial communities in six lakes located across an altitude gradient. Activity was assessed at both the community level, by measuring leucine bulk ...
Sweeney Kristin R KR Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, 73104, - - 2010
Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite that invades and replicates within most nucleated cells of warm-blooded animals. The basis for this wide host cell tropism is unknown but could be because parasites invade host cells using distinct pathways and/or repertoires of host factors. Using synchronized parasite invasion assays, ...
Polonais Valerie - - 2010
Members of the phylum Apicomplexa are motile and rapidly dividing intracellular parasites, able to occupy a large spectrum of niches by infecting diverse hosts and invading various cell types. As obligate intracellular parasites, most apicomplexans only survive for a short period extracellularly, and, during this time, have a high energy ...
Dingle Tanis - - 2010
Herein we describe a real-time quantitative PCR assay for evaluating the adherence of Clostridium difficile to differentiated human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Our investigations demonstrated that the method, employing the C. difficile-specific triose-phosphate isomerase gene, is as reliable but less time-consuming than counting c.f.u. We conclude that the method will be ...
Dzitko Katarzyna - - 2010
During the development and effector phases of the anti-Toxoplasma response, the immunological system of a host is involved in several complex interactions with the endocrine system, and prolactin (PRL) is one of the most important hormones involved in immunoregulation. In this work, the influence of the recombinant human prolactin (rhPRL) ...
Morris David J - - 2010
Eukaryotes form new cells through the replication of nuclei followed by cytokinesis. A notable exception is reported from the class Myxosporea of the phylum Myxozoa. This assemblage of approximately 2310 species is regarded as either basal bilaterian or cnidarian, depending on the phylogenetic analysis employed. For myxosporeans, cells have long ...
Collins Tracy L - - 2010
Current studies have indicated the utility of photodynamic therapy using porphyrins in the treatment of bacterial infections. Photoactivation of porphyrins results in the production of singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) that damages biomolecules associated with cells and biofilms, e.g., proteins, polysaccharides, and DNA. The effect of a cationic porphryin on P. aeruginosa ...
Tong Meiping - - 2010
The significance of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on cell transport and retained bacteria profiles in packed porous media (quartz sand) was examined by direct comparison of the overall deposition kinetics and retained profiles of untreated bacteria (with EPS) versus those of treated cells (without EPS) from the same cell type. ...
Khang Chang Hyun - - 2010
Knowledge remains limited about how fungal pathogens that colonize living plant cells translocate effector proteins inside host cells to regulate cellular processes and neutralize defense responses. To cause the globally important rice blast disease, specialized invasive hyphae (IH) invade successive living rice (Oryza sativa) cells while enclosed in host-derived extrainvasive ...
Buguliskis Jeffrey S - - 2010
Host cell attachment by Toxoplasma gondii is dependent on polarized secretion of apical adhesins released from the micronemes. Subsequent translocation of these adhesive complexes by an actin-myosin motor powers motility and host cell invasion. Invasion and motility are also accompanied by shedding of surface adhesins by intramembrane proteolysis. Several previous ...
Shames Stephanie R - - 2010
Enterohaemorrhagic and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EHEC and EPEC respectively) are diarrhoeal pathogens that cause the formation of attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions on infected host cells. These pathogens encode a type III secretion system (T3SS) used to inject effector proteins directly into host cells, an essential requirement for virulence. In ...
Magassa N'Goundo - - 2010
Bacterial toxin injection into the host cell is required for the virulence of numerous pathogenic bacteria. Cytolysin-mediated translocation (CMT) of Streptococcus pyogenes uses streptolysin O (SLO) to translocate the S. pyogenes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-glycohydrolase (SPN) into the host cell cytosol, resulting in the death of the host cell. Although SLO ...
Mazariego-Espinosa Karina - - 2010
Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is the leading bacterial cause of diarrhea in the developing world, as well as the most common cause of traveler's diarrhea. The main hallmarks of this type of bacteria are the expression of one or more enterotoxins and fimbriae used for attachment to host intestinal cells. ...
Bernal-Bayard Joaquín - - 2010
Effectors of the type III secretion systems (T3SS) are key elements in the interaction between many Gram-negative pathogens and their hosts. SlrP is an effector that is translocated into the eukaryotic host cell through the two virulence-associated T3SS of Salmonella enterica. We found previously that this effector is an E3 ...
Alemka Abofu - - 2010
The HT29MTXE12 (E12) cell line harbors an adherent mucus layer, providing a novel technique to model mucosal infection in vitro. In this study, we have characterized the interaction of Campylobacter jejuni with the E12 cell line and exploited its unique mucus layer to examine the potential efficacy of probiotic treatment ...
Van Engelenburg Schuyler B - - 2010
The type-III secretion system (T3SS) enables gram-negative bacteria to inject effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells. Upon entry, T3SS effectors work cooperatively to reprogram host cells, enabling bacterial survival. Progress in understanding when and where effectors localize in host cells has been hindered by a dearth of tools to study ...
Prakasan M R Sabari - - 2010
Cells and metabolic products of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans were successfully used to separate quartz from hematite through environmentally benign microbially induced flotation. Bacterial metabolic products such as extracellular proteins and polysaccharides were isolated from both unadapted and mineral-adapted bacterial metabolite and their basic characteristics were studied in order to get insight ...
Liu Wei - - 2010
The target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) is the central controller of growth in eukaryotic cells. As one of the downstream targets of TORC1, the protein kinase ScSch9p plays multiple roles in stress resistance, longevity and nutrient sensing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we demonstrate that Candida albicans cells ...
Heussler Volker - - 2010
Intracellular pathogens are known to inhibit host cell apoptosis efficiently to ensure their own survival. However, following replication within a cell, they typically need to egress in order to infect new cells. For a long time it was assumed that this happens by simply disrupting the host cell and in ...
Steck Eric - - 2010
Xenotransplantation of human cells into immune compromised host species is an important experimental setup to follow the faith of implanted cells and the contribution of host cells to tissue regenerates. In this context, it is of major relevance to discriminate between transplanted and host cells. Labeling techniques of donor cells ...
Kim Kyoungtae - - 2010
In this study, the drop-on-demand patterning of bacterial cells on a raw silicon wafer was newly conducted with an electrospray pulsed jet. We produced various sized line patterns and spot patterns of bacterial cells on the silicon wafer under varying experimental conditions of frequency, flow rate, and translational speed of ...
Rennenberg Annika - - 2010
Plasmodium parasites must control cysteine protease activity that is critical for hepatocyte invasion by sporozoites, liver stage development, host cell survival and merozoite liberation. Here we show that exoerythrocytic P. berghei parasites express a potent cysteine protease inhibitor (PbICP, P. berghei inhibitor of cysteine proteases). We provide evidence that it ...
Uppuluri Priya P Department of Biology and South Texas Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases, The University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, United States of - - 2010
Biofilms are dynamic microbial communities in which transitions between planktonic and sessile modes of growth occur interchangeably in response to different environmental cues. In the last decade, early events associated with C. albicans biofilm formation have received considerable attention. However, very little is known about C. albicans biofilm dispersion or ...
Wright C - - 2010
AIMS: To develop a rapid method to quantify the attachment of the cystic fibrosis pathogen, Burkholderia multivorans, to lung epithelial cells (16HBE14o(-)) using real-time PCR with a view to monitoring potential inhibition of lung cell attachment. METHODS AND RESULTS: Mammalian and bacterial DNA were purified from bacteria attached to lung ...
Bueno Susan M - - 2010
Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium can enter non-phagocytic cells, such as intestinal epithelial cells, by virtue of a Type Three Secretion System (TTSS) encoded in the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI-1), which translocates bacterial effector molecules into the host cell. Salmonella can also be taken up by dendritic cells (DCs). Although ...
Torrent Marc - - 2010
The eosinophil cationic protein/RNase 3 and the skin-derived RNase 7 are two human antimicrobial RNases involved in host innate immunity. Both belong to the RNase A superfamily and share a high cationicity and a common structural architecture. However, they present significant divergence at their primary structures, displaying either a high ...
Riley Sean P SP Department of Microbiology, University of Chicago, 920 E. 58th Street, Cummings Life Sciences Center, 707A, Chicago, IL 60637, - - 2010
The pathogenesis of spotted fever group (SFG) Rickettsia species, including R. conorii and R. rickettsii, is acutely dependent on adherence to and invasion of host cells, including cells of the mammalian endothelial system. Bioinformatic analyses of several rickettsia genomes revealed the presence of a cohort of genes designated sca genes ...
Fernandes Rohan - - 2010
The emergence of bacteria that evade antibiotics has accelerated research on alternative approaches that do not target cell viability. One such approach targets cell-cell communication networks mediated by small molecule signaling. In this report, we assemble biological nanofactories within a bioMEMS device to capture and manipulate the behavior of quorum ...
Nieuwland Rienk - - 2010
Prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells release vesicles into their environment. To answer the question why eukaryotic cells release vesicles, we may learn from prokaryotes. Bacteria release outer membrane vesicles, resembling microparticles, which act as "multi-purpose carriers". They contain signalling molecules for other bacteria, deliver toxins to host cells and exchange DNA ...
Durand Enrique A EA Department of Molecular Biology and Microbiology, Tufts University, Boston MA 02111, - - 2010
Type III secretion systems deliver effector proteins from Gram-negative bacterial pathogens into host cells, where they disarm host defences, allowing the pathogens to establish infection. Although Yersinia pseudotuberculosis delivers its effector proteins, called Yops, into numerous cell types grown in culture, we show that during infection Y. pseudotuberculosis selectively targets ...
García Véscovi Eleonora - - 2010
Despite being considered a relatively simple form of life, bacteria have revealed a high degree of structural organization, with the spatial destination of their components precisely regulated within the cell. Nevertheless, the primary signals that dictate differential distribution of cellular building blocks and physiological processes remain in most cases largely ...
Aguilar Julieta - - 2010
The genetic transformation of plant cells by Agrobacterium tumefaciens results from the transfer of DNA and proteins via a specific virulence (vir) -induced type IV secretion system (T4SS). To better understand T4SS function, we analyzed the localization of its structural components and substrates by deconvolution fluorescence microscopy. GFP fusions to ...
von Muhlinen Natalia N MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Division of Protein and Nucleic Acid Chemistry, Cambridge, - - 2010
Autophagy functions as a cell-autonomous effector mechanism of innate immunity by separating bacteria from cytosolic resources and delivering them for lysosomal destruction. How cytosolic bacteria are targeted for autophagy is incompletely understood. We recently discovered that Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium and Streptococcus pyogenes are detected by NDP52 (nuclear dot protein ...
Rada Balázs - - 2010
Hydrogen peroxide production by the NADPH oxidase Duox1 occurs during activation of respiratory epithelial cells stimulated by purified bacterial ligands, such as lipopolysaccharide. Here, we characterize Duox activation using intact bacterial cells of several airway pathogens. We found that only Pseudomonas aeruginosa, not Burkholderia cepacia or Staphylococcus aureus, triggers H2O2 ...
Roehrich A Dorothea AD Departments of Cellular & Molecular Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, University of Bristol, University Walk, BS8 1TD Bristol, United - - 2010
Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are widely distributed virulence determinants of Gram-negative bacteria. They translocate bacterial proteins into host cells to manipulate them during infection. The Shigella T3SS consists of a cytoplasmic bulb, a transmembrane region, and a hollow needle protruding from the bacterial surface. The distal tip of mature, ...
Mahmoud Khaled K - - 2010
Bdellovibrio and like organisms (BALOs) are obligate prokaryotic predators of other Gram-negative bacteria. Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is the most studied organism among BALOs. It has a periplasmic life cycle with two major stages: a motile, non-replicative stage spent searching for prey (the attack phase) and a stage spent inside the periplasm ...
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 >