Worsening economy not affecting business for therapists.
Article Type: Brief article
Subject: Psychotherapists (Supply and demand)
Mental illness (Causes of)
Pub Date: 09/22/2008
Publication: Name: Annals of the American Psychotherapy Association Publisher: American Psychotherapy Association Audience: Academic; Professional Format: Magazine/Journal Subject: Psychology and mental health Copyright: COPYRIGHT 2008 American Psychotherapy Association ISSN: 1535-4075
Issue: Date: Fall, 2008 Source Volume: 11 Source Issue: 3
Topic: Event Code: 600 Market information - general
Geographic: Geographic Scope: United States Geographic Code: 1USA United States
Accession Number: 187049612
Full Text: [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The majority of the U.S. population is likely feeling the extra stress associated with the state of today's economy. Anxiety, depression, sleep problems, and finance-associated marital arguments are on the rise, experts told USA Today. Some therapists, however, seem to be gaining business during this financial strife.

Richard Chaifetz, CEO of ComPsych, the nation's largest employee-assistance mental health program, says requests for therapists have increased 15% to 20% in the past 3 months. Chaifetz says this surge in therapy requests is "primarily driven by concerns about the financial situation."

John Grohol, a psychologist and publisher of PsychCentral.com, says that online message boards and forums are being hit hard by individuals wanting to discuss finances. Those who seemingly have nothing else in common are being pulled together by this common economic thread.

"People are more agitated, anxious and angry.... You wouldn't believe how much the economy is talked about in therapy these days. It's the first time I've seen it in 20 years of practice, and I'm hearing the same thing from colleagues across the country," said psychologist Priscilla Marotta, who runs a middle-class practice in Plantation, Florida.

Marotta added that more than 50% of the clients in her practice discuss their anxiety over the economy, and 25% to 30% say their finances were the primary reason they started therapy.

Elias, M. (2008, July 22). Economy's stuck, but business is booming at therapists' offices. USA Today Retrieved July 24, 2008, from http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/ 2008-07-22-mental-health-finances_N.htm?csp=34
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