The Secret World of Gardens--Fungi.
Article Type: Video recording review
Subject: Video recordings (Video recording reviews)
Author: Lord, Richard, Jr.
Pub Date: 11/01/2012
Publication: Name: The American Biology Teacher Publisher: National Association of Biology Teachers Audience: Academic; Professional Format: Magazine/Journal Subject: Biological sciences; Education Copyright: COPYRIGHT 2012 National Association of Biology Teachers ISSN: 0002-7685
Issue: Date: Nov-Dec, 2012 Source Volume: 74 Source Issue: 9
Topic: NamedWork: The Secret World of Gardens - Fungi (Video recording)
Accession Number: 308743629
Full Text: The Secret World of Gardens--Fungi (DVD, 2004, 22 minutes, Bullfrog Films, http://www. bullfrogfilms.com)

The Secret World of Gardens--Fungi is one of a 13-part series focused on gardens, originally produced for the HGTV network. Though this program focuses on the importance of fungi in the life of gardens, it is filled with interesting and useful information on the biology of fungi that would enhance any lesson on fungi or unit on ecology or biodiversity

Beneath the variety of flowers in the garden lives a secret garden, mostly concealed. This secret garden is made up of the fungi, organisms that superficially resemble both plants (but without vascular tissue or photosynthesis) and animals (because they must get their food from other sources). Fungal activities are responsible for much of a garden's productivity, recycling dead plant and animal matter in the soil to be reused by plants. They also serve as food for insects, slugs, snails, and other invertebrates. Not all fungal activities are beneficial, however. Many plant parasites such as rusts can infect plants, producing spores that spread quickly over large areas. Others, such as mildews, infect leaves without interfering with flowering.

Most students don't come to biology class knowing much about fungi. But this short program, suitable for middle school, high school, college, and adult audiences, is packed with sufficient information to give students a good background on fungal activities, interrelationships with other organisms, and roles in ecosystems. The photography is stunning, with superb use of time-lapse, close-up, and nighttime photography as well as electron microphotography. I highly recommend this DVD.

DOI: 10.1525/abt.2012.74.9.12

Richard Lord, Jr.

23 Blake Ave.

Saco, ME 04072

rnlord@aol.com
Gale Copyright: Copyright 2012 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.


 
Previous Article: Homo Toxicus.
Next Article: Science con-artists.