Parental weight: strongly influences thinness in children.
Article Type: Brief article
Subject: Children (Health aspects)
Obesity (Risk factors)
Obesity (Research)
Pub Date: 09/22/2011
Publication: Name: Annals of the American Psychotherapy Association Publisher: American Psychotherapy Association Audience: Academic; Professional Format: Magazine/Journal Subject: Psychology and mental health Copyright: COPYRIGHT 2011 American Psychotherapy Association ISSN: 1535-4075
Issue: Date: Fall-Winter, 2011 Source Volume: 14 Source Issue: 3
Topic: Event Code: 310 Science & research
Product: Product Code: E121920 Children
Geographic: Geographic Scope: United States Geographic Code: 1USA United States
Accession Number: 277270187
Full Text: Children with thinner parents are three times more likely to be thin than children whose parents are overweight, according to a new study by UCL researchers.

The study, published October 3 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, shows strong familial influence on pediatric thinness. It was based on results from the Health Survey for England, in which data are collected annually from multiple households. From 2001 to 2006, trained interviewers recorded the heights and weights of parents and up to two children in 7,000 families, and used this information to calculate their BMI.

The results showed a strong association between children's and parents' body size. When both parents were in the thinner half of the healthy-weight range, the chance of the child being thin was 16.2%, compared with 7.8% when both parents were in the upper half of the healthy weight range, 5.3% with two overweight parents, and only 2.5% for children with two obese parents.

Professor Jane Wardle, UCL Epidemiology & Public Health, added: "Parents are often concerned if their child is thin, but it may just be their 'skinny genes'. All genes have two versions, called alleles. We might think of weight-related genes as having a 'skinny' and 'curvy' allele. Thinner parents are likely to have more of the skinny alleles, increasing the chance of passing them on to their children. A child who inherits more of the skinny alleles from their parents will be naturally thinner."

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Cancer Research UK (2011, Oct 4). Parental weight strongly influences thinness in children. ScienceDaily. Retrieved from http://www. sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111003161933. htm
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