J Zoo Wildl Med.: Venous blood gas and lactate values of mourning doves (Zenaida macroura), boat-tailed grackles (Quiscalus major), and house sparrows (Passer domesticus) after capture by mist net, banding, and venipuncture.
Article Type: Reprint
Subject: Blood gases (Measurement)
Lactates (Measurement)
Mourning dove (Physiological aspects)
English sparrow (Physiological aspects)
Pub Date: 06/01/2012
Publication: Name: Journal of Avian Medicine and Surgery Publisher: Association of Avian Veterinarians Audience: Academic Format: Magazine/Journal Subject: Health Copyright: COPYRIGHT 2012 Association of Avian Veterinarians ISSN: 1082-6742
Issue: Date: June, 2012 Source Volume: 26 Source Issue: 2
Geographic: Geographic Scope: United States Geographic Code: 1USA United States
Accession Number: 298292715
Full Text: Venous blood gas and lactate values of mourning doves (Zenaida macroura), boat-tailed grackles (Quiscalus major), and house sparrows (Passer domesticus) after capture by mist net, banding, and venipuncture. Harms CA, Harms RV. J Zoo Wildl Med. 2012;43:168-170.

Blood gas partial pressures, pH, and bicarbonate and lactate concentrations were measured from the basilic vein of mourning doves (Zenaida macroura) and the jugular vein of boat-tailed grackles (Quiscalus major) and house sparrows (Passer domesticus) to assess immediate impacts of mist net capture and handling for banding and venipuncture. Mourning doves and house sparrows exhibited mild acidemia (median [minimum-maximum] venous blood [pH.sub.4][degrees]C] = 7.394 [7.230-7.496] and 7.395 [7.248-7.458], respectively, relative to boat-tailed grackles; 7.452 [7.364-7.512]), but for different reasons. Mourning doves exhibited relative metabolic acidosis (lower venous blood pH, higher lactate concentrations, lower bicarbonate, and no significant differences in partial pressure of C[O.sub.2] (P[co.sub.2]) or partial pressure of [O.sub.2] (P[o.sub.2]) compared with boat-tailed grackles). House sparrows exhibited relative respiratory acidosis (lower venous blood pH, higher Pc[o.sub.2], lower P[o.sub.2], and no significant differences in bicarbonate and lactate concentrations compared with boat-tailed grackles). All birds captured by mist net and handled for banding and venipuncture experienced some degree of lactic acidemia; and values were greater in mourning doves (lactate, 7.72 mmol/L [3.94-14.14 mmol/L]) than in boat-tailed grackles (5.74 mmol/L [3.09-8.75 mmol/L]) and house sparrows (4.77 mmol/L [2.66-12.03 mmol/L]), despite mourning doves resisting least and being easiest to disentangle from the mist net. House sparrows were more susceptible to respiratory acidosis, warranting particular care in handling birds <30 g to minimize interference with ventilation. The different sample collection site for mourning doves may have affected results in comparison with the other 2 species, due to activity of the wing muscles. However, despite the higher lactate concentrations, Pc[o.sub.2] was relatively low in doves. The metabolic, respiratory, and acid-base alterations observed in this study were minor in most cases, indicative of the general safety of these important field ornithology techniques. The effect of other adverse conditions, however, could be additive.

Harms CA, Harms RV.
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