The California School Psychologist brings science to practice: university and school collaborations to promote student success.
Article Type: Editorial
Author: Jimerson, Shane R.
Pub Date: 01/01/2009
Publication: Name: The California School Psychologist Publisher: California Association of School Psychologists Audience: Academic Format: Magazine/Journal Subject: Psychology and mental health Copyright: COPYRIGHT 2009 California Association of School Psychologists ISSN: 1087-3414
Issue: Date: Annual, 2009 Source Volume: 14
Accession Number: 264174757
Full Text: This volume of The California School Psychologist is the last this decade that I will be responsible for in my service as Editor. Thus, prior to a synthesis of articles included in the current volume, it is essential to provide appreciation, commendation, and reflection on the recent volumes of The California School Psychologist. In addition, I will provide a brief summary of the history of The California School Psychologist.

Accolades to All Who Have Contributed

First and foremost it is essential to recognize and applaud those with whom I collaborated as editor, in particular those who have served as associate editors (Michael Furlong, Brent Duncan, Stephen Brock, and Kristin Powers), and co-editor (Marilyn Wilson, 2000) during the past decade, as their collective efforts have contributed to the quality of the articles published in The California School Psychologist. In addition, we are indebted to the many school psychologists (i.e., faculty, practitioners, and students) who have served on the Editorial Board and Student Editorial Panel during the past decade, as it is their reviews that inform necessary revisions and contribute to the quality of and editorial dispositions regarding each manuscript (each Editorial Board and Student Editorial Panel member is listed on the inside cover of each volume). The faculty and students at the University of California, Santa Barbara are to be commended for their incredibly generous support and contributions to The California School Psychologist, sustaining and enhancing the high quality of the journal through substantive as well as layout production during most of the past decade. Finally, sincere gratitude is expressed for the copyediting and recent formatting completed within the California Association of School Psychologists office, most notably Heidi Holmblad for ensuring the high quality of the publication.

A Brief History of The California School Psychologist

The California School Psychologist is an invaluable resource for faculty, students, and practitioners in school psychology across the state of California. For faculty, it represents an important venue for disseminating scholarship. For practitioners and students, the journal provides relevant, peer-reviewed information, bringing science to practice and thus contributing to continuing professional development to school psychologists across the state, as well as those who access the contents across the country and around the world, and emphasizing evidence-based prevention and interventions strategies to enhance student outcomes.

The California School Psychologist was established by the California Association of School Psychologists (CASP) 1996 as a member service. The production and layout was completed at the University of California, Santa Barbara up until the 2008 volume, when the CASP office embraced these responsibilities.

Leadership for the first three volumes of The California School Psychologist (1996, 1997, and 1998) was provided by Dr. Pauline Mercado, with Dr. Mike Furlong contributing as the associate editor. Dr. Marilyn Wilson served as editor in 1999 and 2000, with Dr. Shane Jimerson joining her as co-editor in 2000. In 2001, Dr. Jimerson continued as the editor, with Drs. Mike Furlong and Brent Duncan contributing as associate editors. In 2003, Drs. Stephen Brock and Kristin Powers joined as associated editors along with Dr. Furlong until 2007, with Drs. Jimerson (editor), Brock and Powers (associate editors) continuing through 2009. As of 2010 Dr. Michael Hass will provide leadership with Drs. Kelly Graydon and Brian Leung serving as associate editors. It has been both an honor and a privilege to collaborate with colleagues and students to contribute to The California School Psychologist.

Since its inception, efforts have been made on an on-going basis to improve the quality and contributions of The California School Psychologist. Progress toward these objectives during the past decade includes: 1) refined and further enhanced the editorial board infrastructure, including the addition of a student editorial panel; 2) prepared, submitted, negotiated, and successfully included in PsycINFO database; 3) prepared, submitted, negotiated, and successfully included in ERIC database; 4) funding provided by a grant secured by the UCSB Center for School-Based Youth Development to further enhance the content, including added pages; 5) prepared a series of special topic sections (e.g., volume 8 -school engagement, youth development, and school success; volume 9 - strength-based assessment, youth development, and school success; volume 10 - response to intervention approaches: supporting early and sustained success for all students; volume 12 - promoting school success among students with emotional or behavioral disorders; and volume 13 - promoting reading success among students); 6) the content doubled from 80 pages to 160 pages; 7) obtained manuscripts from recognized scholars from across the nation; 8) providing access to the journal on-line one year following publication at www.education.ucsb. edu/school-psychology and at www.casponline.org, and 9) enhanced status such that The California School Psychologist is now nationally recognized.

Collectively, articles in The California School Psychologist have aimed to advance both the science and practice of school psychology, with a special emphasis on promoting the development and addressing the needs of the diverse population of students across California. Considering the breadth of knowledge, talents, and skills among school psychologists, I believe that school psychologists will continue to contribute in many important ways to promoting youth development and the education of all students in California. Each of the titles of the previous introduction articles (see Table 1) is a declaration that identifies several salient contributions of The California School Psychologist (this phrase is used intentionally to simultaneously refer to both the journal as well as the professionals). There is coherence in the content across the past decade, with a broad emphasis on promoting youth development and supporting student success, it is highlighted that The California School Psychologist is a catalyst for change and a quintessential resource, with a central aim to bring science to practice. Topics that have included special emphasis during the past decade include understanding; a) reading success, b) school engagement, b) strength-based assessment, c) response to intervention (RTI), d) autism, e) students with emotional or behavioral disorders, and e) university-school collaboration to promote student success. Address correspondence and reprint requests to Shane R. Jimerson; University of California, Santa Barbara; Department of Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology; 2113 ED; Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9490 or e-mail Jimerson@education.ucsb.edu

The Current Volume

This volume of The California School Psychologist continues to bring science to practice with many thoughtful and thought-provoking articles, including articles in the special topic section highlighting university-school collaboration, consultation, and cooperation to promote student success. Each of these articles provides valuable information for school psychologists and other professionals working in the schools, and also contributes to the literature and scholarship that aims to promote the educational success of all students.

The first article (Muyskens, Betts, Lau, & Marston, 2009) examines the predictive validity of curriculum-based measures (CBM) of English reading fluency among fifth-grade students who are English language learners. In California particularly, as well as many other regions across the county, the number of students considered "English language learners" continues to expand. Hence, the importance to identify valid and efficient measures of reading for students whose first language is not English. The findings of this study indicate that the CBM reading fluency scores are a significant predictor of later performance on tests for state accountability tests for fifth grade ELL students, including individual language groups of Spanish, Hmong, and Somali. Based on the results of this study, the authors conclude that the measure of CBM English reading fluency has a high level of specificity and, thus, is a good indicator of later status as failing to meet the proficiency level in reading on the state-mandated, proficiency test.

The second article (Rutherford-Becker & Vanderwood, 2009) explores the relationship between literacy and mathematics skills using curriculum-based measures (CBM) with fourth- and fifth- grade students. Specifically this study reports the results of analyses of oral reading fluency (ORF) and Maze reading comprehension, as related to math performance (CBM math computation and applied math). Results revealed that math computation was the best predictor of applied math performance, followed by the Maze task measuring reading comprehension. Furthermore, results ORF did not significantly predict applied math test scores above and beyond math computation and Maze. Based on these results, the authors emphasize that when intervening with students with math difficulties, it is important to keep in mind that reading influences applied math skills. This highlights the importance of making the distinction between students that have difficulty only with math versus students that have difficulty with both math and reading.

The third article (Furlong, Ritchey, & O'Brennan, 2009) shares the results of a study to develop norms for the California Resilience Youth Development Module of the California Healthy Kids Survey (CHKS). With the objective of facilitating broader access to and use of this strength-based instrument, the authors report normative data on the internal assets and school-focused external resources subscales of the RYDM, including grade, ethnicity, and gender patterns. The authors conclude that through better understanding the strengths and needs of specific students related to their internal assets (e.g., selfefficacy, problem-solving, empathy, and awareness) and school resources (e.g., supports, meaningful participation, and connectedness), school psychologists can implement support services, for high-risk students that are linked directly to school-wide youth development efforts.

Recognizing the importance of understanding how schools are coping with incidents of peer victimization, the fourth article (O'Malley, 2009) reports prevailing interventions to address peer victimization at school among California school psychologists. The author highlights that the interventions reported to be the most widely available were a) whole-school no tolerance policies and b) school-to-home communication. Furthermore, interventions endorsed as most important were a) the whole-school no tolerance policy; b) general school climate interventions; c) school to home communication; and d) education of school personnel about bullying. Finally, the author reports that school psychologists report primary intervention (relative to secondary and tertiary) are most important for reducing levels of bullying at their schools.

The fifth article (Neseth, Savage, and Navarro, 2009) examines the impact of acculturation and perceived social support on mathematics achievement amongst Latino/a high school students. The results indicated that one's level of acculturation did not impact one's mathematics achievement, while positive correlations between teacher and peer support and mathematics achievement were evident. The authors highlight that those participants who did not feel supported in their lives were also those who did not perform well within the classroom. Furthermore, the authors note that results of this study demonstrated that participants who had a strongly Mexican orientation were just as likely to be successful as those who did not. The authors conclude that by helping to promote knowledge, awareness, and of cultural competence among teachers, administrators, and other educational service providers, school psychologists may be playing an important role in helping Latino students experience academic success.

The articles included in the special topic section highlighting university-school collaboration, consultation, and cooperation emphasize the importance of school psychology faculty, practitioners and graduate students working together to promote student success. As an applied science, engaging in scholarship that informs practice is an essential aspect of school psychology. Collaborative, consultative, and cooperative projects afford opportunities to advance both science and practice. There are important contributions that emerge through engaging in action research and partnering with local schools to addresses targeted needs and promote student success. Indeed, it is vital to consider collaboration, consultation, and cooperation on a continuum as each varies across projects. The projects described in articles in this section serve as examples of contemporary collaborations addressing important topics such as; a) developing an appropriate kindergarten student entrance profile, b) understanding the concurrent validity of behavioral and emotional screening scores and student academic, behavioral, and engagement outcomes, c) the use of universal screening and teacher referral for early identification of behavior and emotion problems among students, d) exploring relationships among positive behaviors and negative functioning among students, e) examining classroom implementation of the Second Step curriculum for impulse control and problem solving, and f) guidelines, considerations, and implications for the use of solution-focused brief counseling. Each of these topics is timely and each of the articles in this section offers information and insights related to conducting action research in collaboration with school partners.

The sixth article (Lilles, Furlong, Quirk, Felix, Dominquez, & Anderson, 2009) shares information regarding the development of the Kindergarten Student Entrance Profile (KSEP). The KESP is a universal screening measure developed by a school district to assess children's readiness for school. This action research study reports the psychometric proprieties of the KSEP, including its prediction of academic achievement through grade 2. The authors conclude that while further research is warranted, the KSEP has promise because it provides teachers information about the nature of the readiness of students entering kindergarten when used as part of greater kindergarten articulation efforts.

The seventh article (Renshaw, Eklund, Dowdy, Jimerson, Hart, Earhart, & Jones, 2009) reports the results of an action research study examining the relationship between scores on the Behavioral and Emotional Screening System and elementary student academic, behavioral, and engagement outcomes. The results revealed that students' risk-level classifications were significantly related to school-based outcome criterions and that school-based outcome criterions were deemed to be effective discriminators of students' risk-level classification. The authors emphasize that school-based universal screening may provide opportunities for early identification and intervention, thus, possible preventing the development of more severe problems and promoting more positive outcomes in the future.

The eighth article (Eklund, Renshaw, Dowdy, Jimerson, Hart, Jones, & Earhart, & 2009) presents results of an action research project exploring early identification of behavioral and emotional problems among elementary students. In particular this study reports the results of universal screening and teacher-referral for use in identifying students at risk for emotional and behavioral problems. The results revealed that of the students identified as at-risk by the universal screening measure, only half were previously identified through current teacher referral practices. In considering the results of this study, in addition to the results of previous studies investigating screening for emotional and behavioral risk, the authors conclude that universal screening may be a viable approach to early identification of students at-risk for behavioral, emotional, and academic problems.

The ninth article (Earhart, Jimerson, Eklund, Hart, Jones, Dowdy, & Renshaw, 2009) shares the results of an action research project examining the interrelationships between three measures of positive functioning and one measure of maladaptive behaviors and emotions among elementary students. The authors highlight that as methods of assessment improve and further enhance our understanding of student development, it is crucial to understand the interrelationship among strength-based and traditional - problem-based - measures. The results of this study revealed that the measures assessing positive constructs were significantly positively correlated with each other and negatively correlated with a measure of problem behaviors. The authors note that the use of positive measures may encourage more strengthbased assessment and intervention practices in schools.

The tenth article (Hart, Dowdy, Eklund, Renshaw, Jimerson, Jones, & Earhart, 2009) is an action research project that reports the results of a controlled study assessing the effects of the impulse control and problem solving unit of the Second Step Curriculum. The control-comparison, pre-post methodology used in this study may serve an exemplar for practicing school psychologists who seek to examine the effects associated with classroom interventions. Results revealed that change was evident from preto-post test for third- and fourth-grade students, however, relative to the control group of students, there was only a significant difference among the third-grade students. The authors highlight the importance of including control group data, noting that without such data it would not have been possible to evaluate the differential effects of the intervention. The authors also emphasize the importance of the development of measures sensitive to behavioral change.

Providing counseling in the school context can be challenging, particularly considering the numerous demands on the time of school psychologists. The eleventh article (Jones, Hart, Jimerson, Dowdy, Earhart, Renshaw, Eklund, & Anderson, 2009) explores the use of solution-focused brief counseling (SFBC) with school-age children. The authors provide a brief overview of the extant scholarship regarding SFBC, describe guidelines for implementing this approach, explore considerations and implications for school psychologists who use this approach to provide counseling services, and recommend future directions for scholarship. The authors also share lessons learned through a university and school collaboration to provide student support services. Overall the authors conclude that presently, there is a paucity of empirical evidence supporting the use of SFBC with children and adolescents; however, the extant literature reveals that it may be associated with favorable outcomes. Thus, further research is warranted to determine whether SFBC may be a valuable counseling technique to implement in the schools with children.

The collection of articles included in this volume contributes valuable information that may be used by educational professionals working with children, families, and colleagues to enhance the academic success and promote positive developmental trajectories of students. The authors provide valuable information and insights that advance our understanding of numerous important topics. The California School Psychologist continues to contribute important information to promote the social and cognitive competence of all students.

references

Earhart, J., Jimerson, S.R., Eklund, K., Hart, S.R., Jones, C.N., Dowdy, E., & Renshaw, T.L. (2009). Examining relationships between measures of positive behaviors and negative functioning for elementary school children. The California School Psychologist, 14, 97-104.

Eklund, K., Renshaw, T.L., Dowdy, E., Jimerson, S.R., Hart, S.R., Jones, C.N., & Earhart, J., (2009). Early identification of behavioral and emotional problems in youth: Universal screening versus teacher-referral identification. The California School Psychologist, 14, 89-95.

Furlong, M.J., Ritchey, K.M., & O'Brennan, L.M. (2009). Developing norms for the California Resilience Youth Development Module: Internal assets and school resources subscales. The California School Psychologist, 14, 35-46.

Hart, S.R., Dowdy, E., Eklund, K., Renshaw, T.L., Jimerson, S.R., Jones, C. & Earhart, J. (2009). A controlled study assessing the effects of the impulse control and problem solving unit of the Second Step Curriculum. The California School Psychologist, 14, 105-110.

Jimerson, S.R. (2008). The California School Psychologist provides valuable information to promote reading success among students. The California School Psychologist, 13, 3-6.

Jimerson, S.R. (2007). The California School Psychologist provides valuable information to promote school success among students with emotional or behavioral disorders. The California School Psychologist, 12, 5-8.

Jimerson, S.R. (2006). The California School Psychologist contributes valuable knowledge to support student success. The California School Psychologist, 11, 3-6.

Jimerson, S.R. (2005). The California School Psychologist Provides Valuable Information Regarding Response to-Intervention Approaches to Support Early and Sustained Success for All Students. The California School Psychologist, 10, 3-7.

Jimerson, S. (2004). The California School Psychologist provides valuable information regarding strength-based assessment, youth development, and school success. The California School Psychologist, 9, 3-7.

Jimerson, S.R. (2003). The California School Psychologist provides valuable information regarding school engagement, youth development, and school success. The California School Psychologist, 8, 3-6.

Jimerson, S.R. (2002). The California School Psychologist as a quintessential resource. The California School Psychologist, 7, 2-4.

Jimerson, S., & Wilson, M. (2001). The California school psychologist as a catalyst for change. The California School Psychologist, 6, 2-4.

Jones, C.N., Hart, S.R., Jimerson, S.R., Dowdy, E., Earhart, J., Renshaw, T.L., Eklund, K., & Anderson, D. (2009).

Solution-focused brief counseling: Guidelines, considerations, and implications for school psychologists. The California School Psychologist, 14, 111-122.

Lilles, E., Furlong, M., Quirk, M., Felix, E., Dominquez, K., & Anderson, M. (2009). Preliminary development of the Kindergarten Student Entrance Profile. The California School Psychologist, 14, 71-80.

Muyskens, P., Betts, J., Lau, M.Y. & Marston, D. (2009). Predictive validity of curriculum-based measures in the reading assessment of students who are English language learners. The California School Psychologist, 14, 11-21.

Neseth, H., Savage, T.A., & Navarro, R. (2009). Examining the impact of acculturation and perceived social support on mathematics achievement among Latino high school students. The California School Psychologist, 14, 59-69.

O'Malley, M.D. (2009). Prevailing interventions to address peer victimization at school: A study of California school psychologists. The California School Psychologist, 14, 47-57.

Renshaw, T.L., Eklund, K., Dowdy, E., Jimerson, S.R., Hart, S.R., Earhart, J., & Jones, C.N. (2009). Examining the relationship between scores on the Behavioral and Emotional Screening System and student academic, behavioral, and engagement outcomes: An investigation of concurrent validity in elementary school. The California School Psychologist, 14, 81-88.

Rutherford-Becker, K.J. & Vanderwood, M.L. (2009). Evaluation of the relationship between literacy and mathematics skills as assessed by curriculum based measures. The California School Psychologist, 14, 23-34.

Shane R. Jimerson

University of California, Santa Barbara
TABLE 1: Titles ofintroduction articles 2000-2009,
illustrating the many contributions ofThe California School
Psychologist to promote the development and education of
all students.

The California School Psychologist brings science
to practice: University and school collaborations
to promote student success. (Jimerson, 2009)

The California School Psychologist provides valuable
information to promote reading success among
students. (Jimerson, 2008)

The California School Psychologist provides valuable
information to promote school success among
students with emotional or behavioral disorders. (Jimerson, 2007)

The California School Psychologist contributes valuable
knowledge to support student success.
(Jimerson, 2006)

The California School Psychologist provides valuable
information regarding Response-to-Intervention
approaches to support early and sustained success
for all students. (Jimerson, 2005)

The California School Psychologist provides valuable
information regarding strength-based
assessment, youth development, and school
success. (Jimerson, 2004)

The California School Psychologist provides valuable
information regarding school engagement,
youth development, and school success. (Jimerson, 2003)

The California School Psychologist as a
quintessential resource. (Jimerson, 2002)

The California School Psychologist as a catalyst
for change. (Jimerson, & Wilson, 2001)

The California School Psychologist in the 21st
Century (Jimerson & Wilson, 2000)
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