Brown B, Morello-Frosch R, Brody JG, et al.: Institutional review board challenges related to community-based participatory research on human exposure to environmental toxins: A case study.
Article Type: Brief article
Subject: Human experimentation in medicine (Management)
Human experimentation in medicine (Standards)
Self-experimentation in medicine (Management)
Self-experimentation in medicine (Standards)
Pub Date: 07/01/2011
Publication: Name: IRB: Ethics & Human Research Publisher: Hastings Center Audience: Academic Format: Magazine/Journal Subject: Health Copyright: COPYRIGHT 2011 Hastings Center ISSN: 0193-7758
Issue: Date: July-August, 2011 Source Volume: 33 Source Issue: 4
Topic: Event Code: 310 Science & research; 200 Management dynamics; 350 Product standards, safety, & recalls Computer Subject: Company business management
Geographic: Geographic Scope: Canada Geographic Code: 1CANA Canada
Accession Number: 268311511
Full Text: Brown B, Morello-Frosch R, Brody JG, et al. Institutional review board challenges related to community-based participatory research on human exposure to environmental toxins: A case study. Environmental Health 2010;9(39):2-12. * The authors offer suggestions for how IRBs can more effectively ensure application of the Belmont principles when evaluating community-based participatory research (CBPR). Drawing from their own experience in multiple CBPR projects in collaboration with two community-based organizations (CBOs), the authors delineate how IRBs' traditional focus on the research subject as an individual hinders CBPR projects, which conceive of communities, as well as individuals, as research subjects. IRBs are particularly hesitant to allow for dynamic and communicative relationships between researcher and subject and also express concerns about sharing data between researcher and subject. The authors argue that effective CBPR often involves communication and data-sharing processes that are distinct from traditional biomedical research. They argue that the current IRB approach to CBPR runs counter to the principles of beneficence and justice, and they conclude that IRBs should develop systematic methods for evaluating the unique facets of CBPR.
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