American Board for Certification in Homeland Security.
Article Type: Calendar
Subject: National security (Calendars)
National security (Conferences, meetings and seminars)
Pub Date: 09/22/2012
Publication: Name: The Forensic Examiner Publisher: American College of Forensic Examiners Audience: Professional Format: Magazine/Journal Subject: Health; Law; Science and technology Copyright: COPYRIGHT 2012 American College of Forensic Examiners ISSN: 1084-5569
Issue: Date: Fall, 2012 Source Volume: 21 Source Issue: 3
Geographic: Geographic Scope: United States Geographic Code: 1USA United States
Accession Number: 300980408
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Wednesday, Oct. 17th

03:00 PM-5:00 PM

[1] ABCHS Pre-Conference Session: It's Not Too Late.... Yet

PRESENTER: John Didden, CHS-III

CEs: 2.0 ABCHS

TIME: 03:00pm-05:00pm

ABSTRACT: In this session attendees will learn the latest global terrorist developments and their links to the United States of America. It will also discuss the latest information of the underestimated threat coming from the Iranian regime. The presentation will provide observations and advice on how the USA and its citizens can/ should improve the fight against terrorism.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to:

1. Discuss the latest developments of homegrown and international terrorism, and

2. Explain what the USA can/should do to increase the fight against terrorism.

Thursday, Oct. 18th

09:30 AM-11:30 AM

[2] Protecting Our Homeland: Domestic and Transnational Threats

MODERATOR: Robert Hughbank, CHS-III

PANELISTS: John Giduck, CHS-V; Richard Hughbank, CHS-IV; John Didden, CHS-III; David Johnson, DABCHS, CHS-V; Marc Glasser, FABCHS, CHS-V; Mike Fagel, CHS-IV, CDP-I; Bob Bryant, CHS-V, CMAS

CEs: 2.0 ABCHS

TIME: 09:30am-11:30am

ABSTRACT: Our country's vital interests are tied directly to international trade and imports and exports of necessary goods and services ranging from energy products, steel and agricultural goods, to high technology electronics and computer equipment. Terrorist attacks in other countries can directly affect our economies of scale.

[3] The Important Role of Cyber Security in Protecting the Homeland

MODERATOR: Andrew Neal, CHS-IV

PANELISTS: Shayne Bates, FABCHS, CHS-V; Gabriela Rosu, CHS-V; Margaret Bond, CHS-V; Eric Svetcov, CISSIP, CISA; Rocco A. DelCarmine, CHS-III; Clay Fielding, MCP, MCT, CEH, CHFE, RF. CHS-I

CEs: 2.0 ABCHS

TIME: 09:30am-11:30am

ABSTRACT: This will be a panel discussion of the impact cyber security has on protecting the United States. The panelists will present on several topics including critical cyber infrastructure protection, likely cyber-based attacks, the impact of cloud technologies, and portable devices. A question and answer session will follow the presentation.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to:

1. Describe how cyber-attacks can impact homeland security,

2. Discuss the importance of basic cyber security in preventing successful attacks,

3. Describe the impact of cloud technologies and portable devices on cyber-attacks and cyber security,

4. Explain our dependence on the nations cyber infrastructure, and

5. Discuss how to strengthen homeland security through your organization's cyber-security policies.

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[4] Planning, Response & Recovery for Special Needs Population

MODERATOR: Barbara Citarella, RN, MS, DABCHS, CHS-V

PANELISTS: David Goldschmitt, MD, CHS-V; Paul Purcell, CHS-V, CDP-I; Joe Moore, CHS-V; Linda Doyle, RN, CHS-III, CDP-I, CFN, CMI-III

CEs: 2.0 ABCHS

TIME: 09:30am-11:30am

ABSTRACT: Natural disasters were unprecedented around the world last year and disaster preparedness continues to remain a daunting task in the face of budget constraints and leadership fatigue. The definition of "special needs" with respect to disaster planning has a much broader context than one would think, and as such, requires a greater depth of vertical and horizontal integration across the preparedness network. The Department of Homeland Security has redefined special needs based on functional limitations. This new definition now includes those individuals without transportation, children, and those who are dependent on medication. Recovery and sheltering for people with special needs is exceptionally difficult when the recovery is long term. This lively, interactive discussion will provide timely insight into short and long term planning needs, sheltering challenges, transportation, communication, and partnerships.

01:00 PM-03:00 PM

[5] What is Intelligence Worth and Do We Need It?

MODERATOR: David Johnson, DABCHS, CHS-V

PANELISTS: Jan Schwartz, PhD, CHS-V, CDP-I; Marquis Laude, CHS-V; Nestor Colls-Senaha, MS, CHS-V; James Sartori, CHS-V, DABCHS, CNTA; Anthony Saputo, CHS-V

CEs: 2.0 ABCHS

TIME: 01:00pm-03:00pm

ABSTRACT: The topics for discussion include:

* The intelligence cycle

* The analytic process

* The challenges to analytics

* Resources

* Training

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to:

1. Discuss the methods of and the importance of professional analyzing intelligence.

[6] Safety & Security: Perception vs. Reality

MODERATOR: Steven Crimando, MA, CHS-V

CEs: 2.0 ABCHS

TIME: 01:00pm-03:00pm

PANELISTS: Gregory Allen, CHS-III; Stuart Eanes, CHS-III; Stephen Somers, CHS-V; James Blair, DPA, FABCHS, CHS-V; Mike Fagel, CHS-IV, CDP-I, Thomas Givens, DABCHS, CHS-V; Lawrence Lavine, DO, MPH, CHS-V; Robert Hall, CHS-V, SSI

ABSTRACT: This panel discussion will evaluate the public's perception of security and safety issues compared to realistic expectations. On the surface the government is perceived to have a plan for every possible emergency we face, from vaccines and antidotes for each chemical, biological, or radiological toxin, to emergency management of a nuclear explosion. Aside from finger-pointing between agencies about who is responsible ... what is the reality?

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to:

1. Discuss response communication and whether or not it is heading back in the right direction since the breakdown of 9/11;

2. Discuss airline security and if the TSA has made airline travel safer in the last decade;

3. Discuss our nation's emergency management community and their ability to respond to a Hurricane Katrina-like disaster;

4. Discuss the intelligence community and their ability to identify threats; and

5. Describe emergency services' abilities to deal with an unconventional attack (chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear).

[7] Homeland Security Through Hometown Security

MODERATOR: Wayne Morris, DABCHS, CHS-V

PANELISTS: Val Bilotti, RN, BS, CHS-V; Eric White, FABCHS, CHS-V; John Sullivan, PhD, DABCHS, CHS-V; Cathi Marx, DABCHS, CHS-V; William Cummins, DABCHS, CHS-V

CEs: 2.0 ABCHS

TIME: 01:00pm-03:00pm

ABSTRACT: Protecting the American way of life has been the responsibility of every citizen since the establishment of our Nation. However, consider this question: Since the conception of our country, are we getting better or worse at leveraging each citizen to protect it? Too often, average citizens and small organizations are unable to see how they contribute to the mission of protecting the homeland as the complexity of collaboration between large Public Sector organizations continues to evolve. In the years since the terrorist attacks of 9/11, the Private Sector has emerged as a critical part of securing the nation, but more must be done. To prevent a patient, resourceful, and committed adversary from destroying our way of life, every citizen must be clear about the role that they play. From participating in large coordinated campaigns like "See Something, Say Something" to citizen level training like Citizen Corps, to electing local officials that care about securing the Nation, each citizen must understand the consequences of their actions and inactions. This discussion is about the effective translation of the federal DHS vision, mission, and objectives to the small town business owner and then to each citizen of the United States. We understand that freedom is not free and that generations of men and women have sacrificed to protect the country, but we now face a very different kind of enemy. One that can hide in our communities, schools, churches, and government until they decide to strike. The fight has come to our shores and the stakes have never been higher.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to:

1. Discuss the intent, capabilities, and method of operation of the radical terrorist,

2. Describe the framework for the Federal DHS organization and how it works to reach out to the community and citizens,

3. Discuss what role ABCHS plays in the equation, and

4. Explain what you can do in your place of business, place of worship, and community to protect America.

03:15 PM-05:15 PM

[8] The Necessity of Search Management in SAR Team Deployment

MODERATOR: Mark Withrow, FABCHS, CHS-V

PANELIST: George Dresnek, CHS-I

CEs: 2.0 ABCHS

TIME: 03:15pm-05:15pm

ABSTRACT: It begins with a phone call. Someone is reported missing and a decision is made to activate a search team. Seconds count, the clock is ticking, and the next few hours are critical in saving a life. The presenters explore the decision-making process and the necessary steps involved in SAR deployment. Paramount to the SAR team's success is an experienced Search Manager who has trained in ICS. A discussion of SAR components and the team's interaction with law enforcement is presented along with industry best practices in an effort to establish lessons learned during some of the nation's high profile search cases.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to:

1. Describe the genesis of ICS,

2. Define SAR,

3. List the SAR components, and

4. Discuss the advantages of SAR.

[9] The Value of Prior Military in Homeland Security

MODERATOR: Vanessa Griffin, CHS-IV

PANELISTS: Rick Whitman, MA, CHS-III; Ronald Torgerson, FABCHS, CHS-V; Matthew Peoria, MSSI, CHS-III; Jose Bautista, CHS-V; DE Smith, CHS-V; Jeffrey Fowler, CHS-III

CEs: 2.0 ABCHS

TIME: 03:15pm-05:15pm

ABSTRACT: There are millions of men and women in the private sector that have prior military experience. Many have undergone extensive training in the areas of nuclear, chemical, and biological warfare. They have much to offer in the manner of suggestions and recommendations for protective measures and equipment against such attacks in our local communities. Properly equipped, they can be instrumental in assisting and supplementing first responder groups.

[10] Post-Disaster Trauma: Mental Health and Crisis Intervention

MODERATOR: Marilyn Gilbert, PhD, LPC, CHS-III, DPA, FABCHS, CHS-V

PANELISTS: James Blair, DPA, FABCHS, CHS-V; Raymond Hamden, PhD, CHS-V; Linda Doyle, DABFN, RN, CFN, CMI-III, CH5-III, CDP-I

CEs: 2.0 ABCHS

TIME: 03:15pm-05:15pm

ABSTRACT: This session will discuss the important roles of mental health and crisis intervenor professionals in the aftermath of a catastrophic disaster, and specifically a terrorist attack. A major crisis that involves thousands of victims can become overwhelming. In many cases, the first responders require as much counseling as the victims of the disaster. In some cases, the counselors themselves will need counseling after completing their job in a crisis event.

Friday, Oct. 19th

08:00 AM-10:00 AM

[11] ABCHS General Session

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: William Flynn, Acting Assistant Secretary, National Protection and Programs Directorate Office of Infrastructure Protection and John Giduck, CHS-V

CEs: 2.0 ABCHS

TIME: 08:00am-10:00am

10:15 AM-12:15 PM

[12] Private Sector Emergency Preparedness and Responses

MODERATOR: William Cover, MS, CHS-V

PANELISTS: Paul Purcell, CHS-V, CDP-I; Joel Yonkman, CHS-III; William Besse, CHS-V; Jim Sawyer, CHS-III; Bruce Leeming, CHS-V; Ricco Ches, CHS-V, DABCHS

CEs: 2.0 ABCHS

TIME: 10:15am-12:15pm

ABSTRACT: Interactive panel and group discussion on the private sector communication, cooperation and collaboration with local, state, and federal "first responders." Discussion topics include: updating emergency contact lists; the value of rapid response disaster reports; evaluation impact statements; and local strategic assessments from multiple disciplines and division perspectives.

[13] Threat Assessment

MODERATOR: David Johnson, DABCHS, CHS-V

PANELISTS: Gerry Cavis, CHS-III; Mark Garver, CHS-V; Howard Weisman, CHS-V; Rick Colliver, CHS-III; Marc Glasser, CHS-V

CEs: 2.0 ABCHS

TIME: 10:15am-12:15pm

ABSTRACT: Threats in the workplace can occur for many reasons. Sometimes threats are received in response to labor events such as reductions-in-force, plant closures, strikes, or hostile terminations of problem employees. Often they are received as a result of domestic violence that has found its way into the workplace, or because of increased publicity of other graphic violence in our society. Whether you are a protection specialist collating protective intelligence, a human resources professional assigned to a troubled employee, or a security manager just trying to maintain a safe workplace, it becomes vital to understand how to expediently manage threatening behaviors and comments so that those targeted remain safe and the workforce remains productive. In this day and age of lean budgeting, how do you know how much security is appropriate? In this program, you will learn how to: identify which characteristics of behavior can alert you to an individual's propensity for violence; evaluate the significance of suspicious correspondence and other communications; choose between appropriate investigation and intervention strategies; and determine when clinician involvement is indicated.

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LEARNING OBJECTIVES: After the presentation, the participant should be better able to:

1. Explain the difference between targeted violence and non-specific violence,

2. Describe the difference between "making" a threat and "posing" a threat,

3. Discuss the thinking and behavior processes associated with violence escalation,

4. Design a threat management program/process in your organization,

5. Evaluate potential intervention/mitigation strategies,

6. Qualify and quantify levels of risk that an individual might pose, and

7. Determine when law enforcement or clinician involvement is indicated.

[14] The Latest Trends & Techniques for Critical Infrastructure Protection

MODERATOR: Robert Coullahon, CHS-V, CEM

PANELISTS: Steven King, MS, MBA, CHS-V; John Sullivan, PhD, DABCHS, CHS-V; Kurt Klingenburger, CHS-V; Cecelia Wright-Brown, DEng, MS, CHS-V

CEs: 2.0 ABCHS

TIME: 10:15am-12:15pm

ABSTRACT: This interactive panel of experts will share with you their lessons learned from years of experience working critical infrastructure protection at all levels of government as well as in the private sector. Panelists will discuss the most current programs and resources from the Department of Homeland Security and the FBI. Learn how you can better protect the facilities, networks, and systems responsible for our American way of life. The Homeland Security Information Network (HSIN), InfraGard, various security vulnerability assessment tools, Protective Security Advisors, DHS OneView, Common Operating Pictures, and many other free resources available to ABCHS members will be presented with ample opportunity for audience participation.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to:

1. Use free resources available to improve the protection of critical infrastructure assets, facilities, networks, and systems;

2. Discuss lessons learned from mistakes and experiences senior homeland security professionals have gained from years of critical infrastructure protection;

3. Discuss specific ways geospatial technology can enhance security, emergency response, and critical infrastructure protection; and

4. Describe new training opportunities for homeland security professionals, including Mission Critical TV, Naval Postgraduate School, the Emergency Management Institute, and many more.

01:45 PM-03:45 PM

[15] Many Faces of Chaplaincy

MODERATOR: Charles Singletary, CMC

PANELISTS: Joseph Prudhomme, PhD, ThD, CMC, CHS-III; Don Howe, CMC; Jesus Huertas, DMin, DBS, CMC

CEs: 2.0 ABCHS

TIME: 01:45pm-03:45pm

ABSTRACT: This panel discussion will include a 10 minute overview of various venues of specialized chaplaincy by each panel member. The remainder of time will be dedicated to a question/answer session with the audience and among panel members. The discussion is designed to give a broad overview of some of the more popular areas of chaplaincy, and answer questions pertaining to those areas of specialized chaplaincy including military homeland security, addiction and PTSD among vets, law enforcement, and hospital chaplaincy.

[16] Forensic/Criminal Investigation Responsibilities for Law Enforcement Rank and File Structure When Responding to a Criminal Incident

MODERATOR: Steve Russell, CHS-III

PANELISTS: Sean Kinney, CHS-V; Patrick Spoerry, PhD, CHS-V, CFC; William Kushner, CHS-V; Walter Kimble, DABCHS, CHS-V; Debra Russell, PhD, CHS-V

CEs: 2.0 ABCHS

TIME: 01:45pm-03:45pm

ABSTRACT: This panel discussion will cover the following topics:

* Discussion of the first responding officer's responsibilities and duties upon arriving at a criminal incident in terms of forensic and criminal investigation,

* Discussion of the criminal investigator's responsibilities and duties upon arriving at a criminal incident in terms of forensic and criminal investigation,

* Discussion of the forensic specialist's responsibilities and duties upon arriving at a criminal incident in terms of forensic and criminal investigation,

* Discussion of the supervisor's responsibilities and duties upon arriving at a criminal incident in terms of forensic and criminal investigation, and

* Discussion of the public information officer's responsibilities and duties at a criminal incident in terms of forensic and criminal investigation.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to:

1. Describe the responsibilities of each responder in terms of forensic and criminal investigations following a criminal incident.

[17] Psychology of Terrorist Recruitment

MODERATOR: Robert Hughbank, CHS III

PANELISTS: Richard Hughbank, CHS-IV; Raymond Hamden, PhD, CHS-V ; Debra Russell, PhD, CHS-V

CEs: 2.0 ABCHS

TIME: 01:45pm-03:45pm

ABSTRACT: Terrorists and terror regimes today have the desire to influence the global population with either religious or political ideology [Ethno-Geographic Terrorists]. Such motive of aggression could be the "power to kill" without remorse [Psychopathic Terrorists]. Such belligerence may be an act of revenge for a personal disaster experienced [Retributional Terrorists]. Some experts would argue that terrorism may not be due to protracted social conflict--poverty and lack of education. Yet others focus on just these factors of basic human needs. What is the making of a terrorist? Why would some people give their lives for destruction at home or in a foreign land? Recruitment of adolescents may not be so difficult for terror management. Teenagers have three factors to achieve: gain independence, development of their own identity, and achieve emotional stability. The terror regime may offer gainful income, heroism, and fame, and offer a personal mission for the common good. Adults, men and women, will be vulnerable to acts of aggression and involve their family to die for a cause too. Honor is an intrinsic motive that drives loyalty to ethnic groups. The factors to investigate are not limited to only one group or culture. History of loyalty to the ethnic religion may also be accompanied by a history of interpersonal aggressiveness or competitiveness. How much can psychodynamic theory predict when focused on the common emotional consequence (e.g., anger), of antecedents (retribution, integrity)? The discussion will entail how terrorists think, feel, and behave, along with the neuro-physical factors and environmental influences. To understand who is vulnerable to recruitment by terror organizations, this panel will guide the participants through the psychology of purpose to understand terrorists.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

After the presentation, the participant should be better able to:

1. Discuss neuro-physical factors and environmental influences on terrorists,

2. Explain the making of a terrorist, and

3. Describe how much psychodynamic theory can predict when focused on the common emotional consequence.
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