AJMH based CPE questionaire.
Subject: Medicine, Botanic (Tests, problems and exercises)
Medicine, Herbal (Tests, problems and exercises)
Statins (Tests, problems and exercises)
Isoflavones (Tests, problems and exercises)
Pub Date: 03/22/2011
Publication: Name: Australian Journal of Medical Herbalism Publisher: National Herbalists Association of Australia Audience: Academic Format: Magazine/Journal Subject: Health Copyright: COPYRIGHT 2011 National Herbalists Association of Australia ISSN: 1033-8330
Issue: Date: Spring, 2011 Source Volume: 23 Source Issue: 1
Geographic: Geographic Scope: Australia Geographic Code: 8AUST Australia
Accession Number: 254971786
Full Text: The AJMH based CPE questionnaire system is a voluntary system designed to assist members in the accumulation of NHAA CPE points. Questions are divided into the appropriate subject categories (herbal medicine and medical science) and each question refers to an article in this issue of the Australian Journal of Medical Herbalism. Points accumulated through completion of these questions should be recorded in the NHAA CPE diary. Each completed question is worth one mark in the relevant category. Your completed CPE diary should be returned with your membership renewal at the end of the financial year. For further information please see the NHAA CPE Member's Manual on the NHAA website www.nhaa.org.au.

Herbal medicine questions--AJMH 23(1)

1. Chamomile has shown to be useful in GAD:

a) when given in conjunction with benzodiazepine anxiolytics;

b) at a dose of 220 mg/day increasing up to 880 or 1100 mg over 8 weeks;

c) at a dose of 220 mg/day over 8 weeks; or

d) when consumed as a herbal tea, twice daily.

2. The galactagogue herb fenugreek:

a) is comparable to granulated apple tea in its effect on lactation and infant weight gain;

b) has been shown to cause significant allergy/ hypersensitivity reactions in newborns;

c) has limited effect on the production of breast milk; or

d) has been shown to improve maternal lactation and birth weight catch-up in neonates.

3. When administered in conjunction with statin medication, ginger has been shown to:

a) have little effect on drug activity but significantly reduce statin induced liver changes;

b) significantly reduce statin induced liver injury and enhance the drug's cholesterol lowering activity;

c) significantly reduce statin induced liver changes (only at dose 80 mg/kg); or

d) have no effect on hepatic changes but significantly reduced cholesterol.

4. Artemisinin may play a role in hepatocellular carcinoma:

a) when administered as a whole plant extract;

b) by inhibiting cell motility but not migration;

c) by inhibiting HCC cell metastasis, adhesion and migration; or

d) when administered at a dose of 50-75[micro]M.

5. Epilobium angustifolium has demonstrated antimicrobial activities:

a) in vitro more effectively than vancomycin and tetracycline;

b) in vivo against a variety of common bacteria including S. aureus, E. coli and P. aeruginosa;

c) in vitro with comparable effectivity to vancomycin and tetracycline; or

d) in vivo when using an extract of aerial parts.

6. Andrographolide has exhibited potential for use in the treatment of lung tumour:

a) through its antioxidant carrying capacity;

b) by enhancing the expression of HIF-1[alpha] and thereby metastasis;

c) by inhibiting the expression of HIF-1[alpha] and thereby metastasis; or

d) both a) and b).

Medical science questions--AJMH 23(1)

1. Sleep duration has been shown to:

a) be detrimental for health when averaging more than 9 hours per night;

b) have minimal effect on overall health outcomes;

c) be detrimental for health when averaging less than 5 hours per night; or

d) both a) and c) are correct.

2. The risk of developing gallstones is significantly reduced:

a) in people who are moderately active 3-4 times per week;

b) in premenopausal women who raise their heart rate >20 mins/day;

c) in individuals who engage in a high level of physical activity equivalent to 1hr/day;

d) by avoiding strenuous exercise on a regular basis.

3. A recent review has shown the following factors play a role in arterial stiffness:

a) Soy isoflavones, 540 mg EPA /360 mg DHA, Lactobacillus helveticus and salt supplementation;

b) Lactobacillus helveticus, 360 mg EPA / 540 mg DHA, soy isoflavones and salt restriction;

c) vitamin C, 540 mg EPA / 360 mg DHA, Lactobacillus helveticus and soy isoflavones; or

d) salt restriction, 360 mg EPA / 540 mg DHA, soy isoflavones and antioxidant therapy.

Answers are available from the nhaa office on request office@nhaa.org.au
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